Bike Trails Information

Summit County Bike Trails: Colorado Trail

August 29, 2014 — 

Following a beautiful section of the Colorado Trail, this loop explores forested hillsides and open meadows above the Swan River Valley. The West Ridge section of the Colorado Trail includes some of the area’s most popular singletrack.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Shrine Pass and beyond

September 4, 2014 — 

Starting from Vail Pass, this hiking and mountain biking route provides a good exploration of the Shrine Pass area and its peak-filled vistas.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Wheeler Trail

September 4, 2014 — 

Throughout the summer on Fridays and Saturdays the Summit Daily will run mountain bike and recpath trail guides from our annual Explore Summit County Bike Guide. The rides will be a mix of dirt trails, singletrack and paved roads from all parts of Summit County.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Mayflower Gulch

September 4, 2014 — 

Throughout the summer on Fridays and Saturdays the Summit Daily will run mountain bike and recpath trail guides from our annual Explore Summit County Bike Guide. The rides will be a mix of dirt trails, singletrack and paved roads from across Summit County.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Three forks of the Swan River

August 14, 2014 — 

Throughout the summer the Summit Daily will be running weekly mountain bike and rec path trail guides from our annual Explore Summit County Bike Guide every Friday and Saturday. The rides will be a mix of dirt trails, singletrack and paved roads from across Summit County.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Spruce Creek Loop

August 14, 2014 — 

Throughout the summer on Fridays and Saturdays the Summit Daily will run mountain bike and recpath trail guides from our annual Explore Summit County Bike Guide. The rides will be a mix of dirt trails, singletrack and paved roads from across Summit County.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Breckenridge’s Burro Trail

August 14, 2014 — 

Throughout the summer on Fridays and Saturdays the Summit Daily will run mountain bike and recpath trail guides from our annual Explore Summit County Bike Guide. The rides will be a mix of dirt trails, singletrack and paved roads from across Summit County.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Keystone Gulch

August 14, 2014 — 

Throughout the summer on Fridays and Saturdays the Summit Daily will run mountain bike and recpath trail guides from our annual Explore Summit County Bike Guide. The rides will be a mix of dirt trails, singletrack and paved roads from across Summit County.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Frey Gulch

August 14, 2014 — 

Throughout the summer on Fridays and Saturdays the Summit Daily will run mountain bike and rec path trail guides from our annual Explore Summit County Bike Guide. The rides will be a mix of dirt trails, singletrack and paved roads from across Summit County.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Sallie Barber Mine

August 14, 2014 — 

Throughout the summer on Fridays and Saturdays the Summit Daily will run mountain bike and recpath trail guides from our annual Explore Summit County Bike Guide. The rides will be a mix of dirt trails, singletrack and paved roads from across Summit County.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Dyersville

July 23, 2014 — 

Throughout the summer on Fridays and Saturdays the Summit Daily will run mountain bike and recpath trail guides from our annual Explore Summit County Bike Guide. The rides will be a mix of dirt trails, singletrack and paved roads from across Summit County.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Barney Ford-Juniata Loop

July 23, 2014 — 

With immediate access from downtown Breckenridge, the Barney Ford-Juniata loop climbs from Carter Park up to Sallie Barber Road then descends on a fun section of singletrack back to town. A number of popular Breckenridge mountain bike races end on this section of trail. It makes a great quick ride out of town.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Bakers Tank Loop

July 23, 2014 — 

Throughout the summer on Fridays and Saturdays the Summit Daily will run mountain bike and recpath trail guides from our annual Explore Summit County Bike Guide. The rides will be a mix of dirt trails, singletrack and paved roads from across Summit County.

Learn more »

Summit County Bike Trails: Blue River Pennsylvania/Indiana Loop

July 11, 2014 — 

Throughout the summer on Fridays and Saturdays the Summit Daily will run mountain bike and recpath trail guides from our annual Explore Summit County Bike Guide. The rides will be a mix of dirt trails, singletrack and paved roads from across Summit County.

The meandering Blue River Trail is a great option for polishing singletrack skills and can be combined with a rugged jeep road that explores two scenic drainages.

Know Before You Go: The Blue River Trail is entirely on private land; the landowners have kindly allowed access. Do not leave the designated route; you will be trespassing and jeopardizing future access. Expect other users on this popular trail. Less-skilled riders may want to pedal only the Blue River Trail, which can be ridden as an out-and-back or made into a loop by using the highway. Although the trail is usually dry by early June, the upper loop won’t be snow-free until later in the month.

Parking: From I-70, drive south to Breckenridge on Highway 9. Turn right at the stoplight on the north end of town onto North Park. Drive by City Market and park in one of the large lots located on the left side of Park Avenue.

Description: Pedal back out to Main Street. Turn right and follow it a short distance. Turn left on Boreas Pass Road and climb to the first switchback. Bear right onto a gravel road near a cabin — you’re now on private land for the next 4.5 miles. Access the trail on the right, just before a gate. Ride along a fence line and around the edge of a meadow. The trail swings left and, after some climbing, travels along an old ditch. Cross below a sometimes dry pond, veer right and climb along the left side of a draw, passing several side trails. Drop to a fence and connect with the paved Indiana Creek Road at about 2.7 miles. Turn right and descend briefly until connecting with the trail again — identified on the left side of the road by a sign. Follow the right fork of the trail down to the creek. Please ride through, not around, small muddy sections. If the trail is really muddy, choose a drier or more durable trail to ride. Connect briefly with a paved road, then get back on the trail that continues up a slope to the left on the other side of the creek. Merge with a fork from the left, continuing straight. Ride along a level but very narrow section of trail that follows an old ditch. Drop onto a main dirt road in a Blue River subdivision at about 4.2 miles. To avoid the upper loop, either return as you came or follow Blue River Road as it winds through a neighborhood and out to Highway 9, which you can follow back down to Breckenridge. To complete the entire ride, veer left and ride past some houses. Turn left on Royal Drive, Regal Circle and Coronet. Climb, switchbacking right past some houses. At the large turn-around, get on the narrow jeep road on your left that heads into the forest. It switchbacks right, ascending steeply at first. As the road reaches a narrow valley, it levels a bit. Pass a few faint spur roads and reach a junction at roughly 7.4 miles. Turn left (the right fork climbs steeply to dead-end farther up the valley). Switchback up to the ridge and another junction. Turn left — the spur road follows the ridge, climbs over the Continental Divide and drops steeply to North Tarryall Creek. Descend to a meadow and cross Indiana Creek — a challenging wade until mid-summer — at about 8.9 miles. At the junction, veer left — the right fork climbs to connect with Boreas Pass Road — and continue descending. The road and stream are one for a while; look for trails on the right to bypass this segment. Descend, crossing onto Spruce Valley Ranch property and passing the private firing range. The road eventually becomes paved. Pass a stable and descend on the main road for another 0.7 miles. Look on the right for a fence and the Blue River Trail. Retrace this route back to Breckenridge.

Summit County Bike Trails: Boreas Pass

July 11, 2014 — 

ThrougThroughout the summer on Fridays and Saturdays the Summit Daily will run mountain bike and recpath trail guides from our annual Explore Summit County Bike Guide. The rides will be a mix of dirt trails, singletrack and paved roads from across Summit County.

Boreas Pass Road follows an abandoned narrow-gauge railroad bed to scenic views and historic remains on the Continental Divide, south of Breckenridge. The popular Bakers Tank Trail also can be accessed along this route.

Know Before You Go: Well-maintained and gradual, this road is excellent for novices. When the gate near the trailhead is closed, the road is still snowy and wet. Cyclists should avoid this ride until the gate is opened. Expect vehicle traffic, which can be heavy on weekends. Boreas Pass is above timberline; be prepared for changing weather.

Parking: From I-70, drive south through Breckenridge on Highway 9. Turn left onto Boreas Pass Road at the stoplight at the south end of town. Drive 3.5 miles up this winding road to pavement’s end. Park in a pull-off on the left where the road becomes dirt.

Description: Begin climbing toward Boreas Pass. The ride follows an abandoned railroad grade, which once was the route of the Denver, South Park and Pacific Railroad. This fairly smooth dirt road climbs gradually through beautiful aspen groves, making it a superb fall ride. Pass Baker’s Tank, which stored water for railway use, at 3 miles. Continue climbing on the main road along the flank of Bald Mountain. At the pass, you’ll have incredible views from the Continental Divide. Perched near the road is the restored Boreas Pass Section House. From the pass, return as you came. The road actually continues another 11 miles down to the vast expanse of South Park and the small town of Como.

Summit County Bike Trails: Gold Run Road

July 11, 2014 — 

Throughout the summer on Fridays and Saturdays the Summit Daily will run mountain bike and recpath cycling trail guides from our annual Explore Summit County Bike Guide. The rides will be a mix of dirt trails, singletrack and paved roads from across Summit County.

Gold Run Road is a maintained jeep road that travels through Gold Run Gulch — connecting Tiger Road and French Gulch Road northwest of downtown Breckenridge. The road passes the historic Preston ghost town site and over Gibson Hill for a close-up glimpse of a number of well-preserved mining remains. The road also accesses a number of trails in the Golden Horseshoe area.

Know Before You Go: This area is usually the first to lose snow around Breckenridge and is often rideable by June. Large aspen groves also make this an excellent fall ride. Numerous side roads may make route finding a challenge and also provide some additional exploring. However, much of the land is private. To avoid endangering future access in this region, please respect all “No Trespassing” signs. Changes from this description may occur if development and road improvements continue on private lands in this area. Expect occasional jeep traffic. Most historic buildings are private and fragile; please view them from a distance.

Parking: From I-70, follow Highway 9 south to Breckenridge. Turn right at the stoplight on the north edge of town onto North Park. Drive by City Market and park in one of the large lots located on the left side of Park Avenue.

Description: Get onto the paved recpath starting at Watson and bordering the west side of the river. Descend on it toward Frisco for almost 3 miles. Cross the highway at the traffic light onto Tiger Road. Ride almost a mile alongside the Breckenridge Golf Course and turn right onto Gold Run Road (watch for golf balls). Continue uphill to a junction, where you should bear right. Turn left about a quarter mile farther along the paved road. Climb beyond the golf course and eventually ford a creek, which can be a challenging crossing in early summer. Pass the historic Jessie stamp mill and continue climbing, switchbacking right past a spur road on the left. Curve left just past remains of the Jumbo mine and continue straight at a four-way intersection near collapsed structures marking the Preston townsite. Climb more steeply, passing a couple of side roads on the left and right before reaching the high point on Gibson Hill — about 7.2 miles into the ride. Stay on the main road, contouring along a forested slope. Continue straight at a major four-way intersection and descend for about a mile along an aspen-covered hillside. Eventually you’ll switchback right and merge with the well-traveled French Gulch Road. Turn right and descend to a junction. Turn left onto paved Wellington Road and follow it back to Breckenridge. Turn right on Main Street, take the first left onto Watson and ride back to your vehicle.

Summit County Bike Trails: Mountain Biking in French Gulch

July 11, 2014 — 

Throughout the summer on Fridays and Saturdays the Summit Daily will run mountain bike and recpath trail guides from our annual Explore Summit County Bike Guide. The rides will be a mix of dirt trails, singletrack and paved roads from across Summit County.

The French Gulch Road trail area offers a number of riding options that branch from a well-maintained dirt road that runs through historic French Gulch just outside of downtown Breckenridge. The primary trail, just beyond Breckenridge’s Wellington neighborhood, passes many old mining remains before becoming a rugged track that climbs steeply to a remote mountain pass. The Golden Horseshoe trail area to the north and a number of other trails to the south are also accessible from French Gulch.

Know Before You Go: Lower French Gulch Road (up to the Sallie Barber Mine Spur) is often dry enough to ride by April. The first 6.5 miles of the ride are easy, recommended for novices and usually free of snow by mid-June. The last few miles to the pass require advanced skills and are typically dry from July through September. Expect traffic on Lower French Gulch Road, which is surrounded mainly by private land for the first few miles. Please respect all “No Trespassing” signs. French Pass is above timberline; be prepared for rapidly changing weather. Most historic buildings are private and fragile; please view them from a distance. Beautiful stands of aspen make French Gulch a spectacular fall ride.

Parking: From I-70, follow Highway 9 south to Breckenridge. Turn right at the stoplight on the north edge of town onto North Park. Drive past the City Market store and park in one of the large lots on the left side of Park Avenue.

Description: Follow the beginning of the Sallie Barber Mine ride but continue straight where that ride forks right and drops to the stream. At roughly 4.8 miles, beyond a large tailings slope on the left that spills from the top of Humbug Hill, you ride through a gate. Continue climbing, passing a fork on the left for Little French Gulch. The road gets a little rougher as it passes a few homes nestled in the trees. It crosses over some rocks, boggy areas and a small creek but remains a gradual climb. Eventually you’ll enter a wildflower-filled meadow. At the far end of it, the road starts climbing steeply. Novices should turn around here. Advanced riders can tackle the strenuous ascent to French Pass. After a gate and stream crossing, this rarely used road becomes rock-filled and technically demanding as it traverses lush meadows below rugged peaks. Sometimes changing to singletrack, the route becomes quite steep and may require some walking. Rewarding views from French Pass make the climb worthwhile. The route continues, but heads far south from Summit County toward Highway 285. From the pass, return as you came.

Summit County Bike Trails: Miner's Creek

July 11, 2014 — 

Throughout the summer on Fridays and Saturdays the Summit Daily will run mountain bike and recpath trail guides from our annual Explore Summit County Bike Guide. The rides will be a mix of dirt trails, singletrack and paved roads from across Summit County.

Providing quick access to a network of singletrack trails near Frisco, Miners Creek Road winds past beaver ponds and a meandering creek as it climbs toward the Tenmile Range. From Miners Creek, riders can access portions of the Peaks, Rainbow Lake and Gold Hill trails. Climbing Miners Creek to access the lower portion of the Peaks Trail’s singletrack makes for a great quick loop from town.

Know Before You Go: The part of the road described in this ride is usually dry enough to ride by early June, though the water might be high at creek crossings. There’s fun to be had exploring the several side roads in this area. Expect occasional jeep traffic. There also are camping sites along the Forest Service road. The ride includes roughly 1,100 feet of elevation gain with a continuous grade.

Parking: From I-70, drive through Frisco on Highway 9. Just south of town, turn right at the stoplight at Road #1004. Take the first right at the Miners Creek Road/recpath/Bill’s Ranch sign. Take an immediate left and drive up a narrow paved road a short distance. Park at the trailhead.

Description: Ride past the gateposts and up the recpath access road. Cross the recpath and get onto Miners Creek Road, a dirt road that swings left and climbs. You’ll pass a lot of spurs forking off this route, but the main road remains obvious. The road curves to the right where a couple of spurs, blocked by rocks, fork left. Continue climbing on the main road, eventually crossing over Miners Creek. Climb briefly, passing a fork to the right. (This fork leads to some short loop opportunities that eventually descend toward Frisco and connect with the paved recpath.) Continue climbing along the main road as it meanders along the creek and through shady pine forest. Pass several campsites and, at about 1.3 miles, splash through a creek. Climb more and cross another creek at almost 2 miles.

After another half mile or so, the road curves right and starts climbing more steeply. A short distance up this hill, the main road forks left where an extremely rocky side road continues straight. This is the recommended turn-around point. The road does continue but gets incredibly steep and rocky before ending in about a mile at the upper Miners Creek Trail trailhead.

This extremely rugged trail section qualifies as an advanced bike ride and is better enjoyed by most as a hiking route. The upper portion of the trail eventually connects with the Wheeler Trail.

Summit County Bike Trails: Frisco to Breckenridge recreation path

June 5, 2014 — 

Throughout the summer the Summit Daily will be running weekly mountain bike and recpath trail guides from our annual Explore Summit County Bike Guide every Friday and Saturday. The guides will be a mix of dirt trails, singletrack and paved roads from across Summit County.

Geared toward riders of all ages and abilities, the Blue River Recreational Path parallels the Blue River, connecting Breckenridge and Frisco. This paved recpath is a popular route for cyclists all summer long.

Know Before You Go: This trail is one of the most heavily used sections of the Summit County Recreational Pathway System, especially during the summer weekends and holidays. Anticipate a large number of other bikers and hikers on this popular trail. Also expect to encounter a number of people stopped along the way. The trail crosses several roads and driveways that have vehicular and large-truck traffic. Use caution when crossing these areas.

Parking: In Breckenridge, drive on Watson Street one block west of Main Street. Parking is available on both the north and south sides of Watson Street. The trail begins at Watson Street on the west side of the Blue River and continues north. Other parking areas include the Kingdom Park/Breckenridge Recreation Center, Gold Hill Trailhead off Gateway Drive — County Road 950 — and the Dillon Reservoir Blue River Inlet Parking Area.

Description: Start at the Watson Street parking lot in Breckenridge and follow the recpath along the Blue River adjacent to commercial shops, the Summit County Justice Center and Kingdom Park. At French Street and North Park the trail passes through an underpass next to the river (watch out for water and gravel in these areas). Kingdom Park and a scenic reclaimed section of the Blue River are along the route. At the County Road 3 crossing the trail swings to the west and follows the abandoned Denver, South Park and Pacific narrow gauge railroad grade. Near the Snowbridge Rest Stop, the trail swings back closer to Highway 9 and crosses several roads that have heavy truck traffic on and off the highway. Use caution when crossing these gravel roads. The trail then crosses a pedestrian bridge over the river. Please do not stop on the bridge, as it creates congestion on the path. At the base of Gold Hill the trail is constructed on the top of an elevated, 1,800-foot retaining wall above the highway. A fenced horse meadow borders the west side of the trail north of Gold Hill. Watch the horses, but please do not venture out into the meadow. As the trail approaches Farmer’s Korner it veers to the west behind Summit High School, where you will come to an intersection. Continue straight ahead on the Frisco Farmer’s Korner Path. The spur to the right will take you to the intersection with Highway 9 and Swan Mountain Road. The Frisco Farmer’s Korner Trail climbs a series of small hills, then continues through the Bill’s Ranch area. There are several connections to the town of Frisco off the recpath in this section, including Seventh and Second streets. Be aware that vehicles are allowed on the recpath through the Bill’s Ranch section, which also provides access for residents to their homes along the path.

Additional trail information is available in the free annual Explore Summit County Bike Guide.

Summit County Bike Trails: Lake Dillon rec path

May 30, 2014 — 

Editor’s note: Throughout the summer the Summit Daily will be running weekly trail guides from our annual Explore Summit County Bike Guide every Friday and Saturday. The guides will be a mix of dirt trails, singletrack and paved roads.

Following a combination of paved trails and roads, the Lake Dillon scenic bike route runs along shorelines, through towns and past marinas, and takes riders on a challenging trip up Swan Mountain Road. Riders can select any number of options.

Know Before You Go: Swan Mountain Road is a winding mountain road with an elevation gain of 500 feet that does not have paved shoulders. Be aware at times there is heavy vehicle traffic. Use caution when riding along this 6-mile section of the route. The route is not advised for families with small children or bike trailers.

Parking: Five parking areas along the route include the Tenderfoot Trailhead at the Tenderfoot Road/U.S. 6 intersection, Dillon Nature Preserve Trailhead just off Hwy 6 past the Roberts Tunnel Road entrance, Snake River Inlet north of Swan Mountain Road near Hwy 6, Blue River Parking Area east of Hwy 9 on the south side of Swan Mountain Road immediately after crossing the Blue River, County Commons exit Hwy 9 west onto County Road 1004 and proceed one- quarter mile to County Road 1005 to the County Commons building, Giberson Bay 2 miles east of Frisco along the Dillon Dam Road, Dillon Dam Road and Overlook 1.5 miles west of Dillon on the left side of the road after passing operations buildings.

Description: Starting at the east end of Main Street adjacent to the Frisco Marina, this level section of recpath winds along the Dillon Reservoir’s shoreline passing by the Frisco Cemetery, Ten Mile River inlet, and the Summit Middle School. The path continues through lodgepole pine forests to a section that parallels the Dillon Dam Road. After crossing access roads for Giberson Bay parking and the Heaton Bay Campground, it parallels the road again for a short distance and then crosses the dam. Beyond the dam, the path curves south and merges with Lodgepole Road until you connect to the Dillon Marina. The path resumes above the marina. Follow the recpath to Gold Run Circle, then east on Tenderfoot Road to the trailhead where the recpath resumes and continues parallel to Hwy 6 to Swan Mountain Road. The path will cross the Snake River by means of a large pedestrian bridge. Shortly thereafter, the path intersects another recpath. Take the right fork, which will lead you to Swan Mountain Road. Cross Swan Mountain Road and continue on recpath through Summit Cove following signs for the recpath, which after a climb out of Summit Cove, intersects again with Swan Mountain Road use caution at this intersection. Use caution crossing Swan Mountain Road and continue on the recpath to the Sapphire Point parking area. A restroom facility is available at the summit. Take the Sapphire Point Trail (pedestrian only) for great views of the surrounding peaks. The route then descends quickly to the intersection with Hwy 9. Cross Hwy 9 at the light. The separated recpath resumes just past the intersection on your right. You will then come to the intersection with Frisco Farmer’s Korner Trail. Take a right onto the Frisco Farmer’s Korner Bike path. The path climbs over a hill, then continues through the Bill’s Ranch area.

There are several connections that will lead you back to the town of Frisco and the Frisco Marina, including Miner’s Creek Road, Second and Seventh streets.

Additional trail information is also available in the free annual Explore Summit County Bike Guide.

Summit County Bike Trails: Oro Grande

June 21, 2014 — 

Throughout the summer the Summit Daily will be running weekly mountain bike and recpath trail guides from our annual Explore Summit County Bike Guide every Friday and Saturday. The guides will be a mix of dirt trails, singletrack and paved roads from across Summit County.

Known as one of the first mountain biking trails dry enough to ride every year, the Oro Grande Trail is a solid early-season riding option. Following an aspen-covered hillside above Dillon Reservoir, this ride offers panoramic views of both Ten Mile and the Gore ranges.

Know Before You Go: The rolling terrain is great for novices and is usually dry by mid-May. Large stands of aspen also make this an excellent fall choice. This ride can be shortened to a 6-mile loop by turning right onto a dirt road at about 2.3 miles, and following it past the cemetery to Highway 6. After crossing the Highway riders can access the paved Lake Dillon recpath, which takes you back to the town of Dillon. Be aware that certain portions of the trail are accessible to ATVs and other motorized vehicles.

Parking: From I-70, drive east on Highway 6 to Dillon. Turn left on Lake Dillon Drive at the stoplight. Take an immediate right and follow the road that parallels the highway, turns to dirt and passes a water tank. Park in the pullout on the right by the Tenderfoot Trail sign.

Description: Ride up the dirt road and turn right immediately. Follow this fork past the water facility building on the right and up into the trees. Pass Tenderfoot Trail on the left. The road meanders through open meadows and stands of aspen as it crosses several hills. Just beyond a fence, at about 2.1 miles, you’ll come to a four-way junction and an open area. To do the short, 6-mile loop, turn right and descend. Continue straight for the longer ride and climb, passing under power lines. Then veer left and pass a couple of side roads. The main road remains obvious as it climbs more, then descends to a wood fence and three-way junction at 2.8 miles. Continue straight, passing through the fence onto a road that becomes more of a trail. Veer left near a large berm and climb through a sagebrush hillside. Pedal across a steep slope and swing sharply left above the landfill. Climb through the trees and descend to connect with a main dirt road at almost 4 miles, near a small public shooting range and power station.

From this point you can either return as you came, continue into Frey Gulch or follow the directions to loop back using the highway and paved recpath. Turn right, pedal a short distance past the power plant and take a left on the singletrack trail on the left. Follow it around to the landfill gatehouse. Cross the road in front of the gatehouse and take the singletrack trail that begins next to the chainlink fence down to Hwy. 6. To access Keystone, turn left. To complete the loop, turn right and descend along the highway a short distance. Cross the highway at the Swan Mountain Road stoplight and turn right immediately onto the paved recpath. Follow the recpath back to Dillon. When it merges with a paved road, turn left and descend past some condos. Continue straight and climb a steep hill.

Turn right onto Lake Dillon Drive, cross Hwy. 6 at the stoplight, take a sharp right and ride back up to the trailhead.

Summit County bike trails: Frisco to Dillon and Keystone

May 30, 2014 — 

Editor’s note: Throughout the summer the Summit Daily will be running weekly trail guides from our annual Explore Summit County Bike Guide every Friday and Saturday. The guides will be a mix of dirt trails, singletrack and paved roads.

This week we’re going to look at a popular section of the Lake Dillon rec path. While the path goes all the way around the lake, on both paved trails and roadways, the section of the ride between Frisco and Dillon makes for a pleasant, moderate ride on its own. The route provides great views of Dillon Reservoir and a scenic ride along the Snake River to Keystone Resort.

Know Before You Go: The route passes through a portion of Keystone’s River Course. Please stay on the path and respect areas posted as restricted to bikes. Check out the new paved community pathway between The River Course entrance and Summit Cove to access singletrack trails at the golf course.

Parking: In Frisco, parking is available at the marina in public lots adjacent to Main Street. The main Keystone parking lot is along the north side of Highway 6 across from the Keystone Lodge. In Dillon, parking is available at the marina, and along Highway 9 at the intersection with Tenderfoot Street. (Tenderfoot Trailhead), the Dillon Nature Preserve trailhead and the Snake River inlet parking north of Swan Mountain Road.

Description: The first part of the ride utilizes the description outlined for the around-the-lake loop up to Swan Mountain Road. From there, the path crosses the intersection of Swan Mountain Road at the light and continues north adjacent to Highway 6 along the Snake River as you enter Keystone. Stay on the trail in sections that pass near private property above the river. Once you cross beneath County Road 8 (West Keystone Road), bear right, climb a slight hill and continue until the pathway ends in the Mountain House parking lot. From there, the route alternates between paved pathway and roads. For more information, pick up a copy of Keystone’s Trail Map at the Mountain Bike Headquarters in River Run or call (970) 496-3610.

Additional trail information is also available in the free annual Explore Summit County Bike Guide.

Summit County Bike Trails: Frisco to Vail Pass

June 21, 2014 — 

Throughout the summer the Summit Daily will be running weekly mountain bike and recpath trail guides from our annual Explore Summit County Bike Guide every Friday and Saturday. The rides will be a mix of dirt trails, singletrack and paved roads from across Summit County.

Every year cyclists ring in the start of a new biking season with the opening of Vail Pass recpath. Connecting Frisco to Vail, this portion of trail offers something for everyone. Some area bike shops offer shuttles to the summit of Vail Pass for a strictly downhill ride. Those opting for a shorter loop can go from Frisco to Copper Mountain Resort and back — roughly 6 miles each way — or ride the Summit Stage to Copper and take the trail from there. Those seeking a real High Country challenge can opt for the 1,500-foot vertical gain from Frisco to the top of Vail Pass — approximately 14 miles— or even go all the way to Vail.

The ride is a steady climb with steep grades and switchbacks approaching the top of the pass. The recpath typically opens in late May and is accessible into early October. The section between Officers Gulch and Copper Mountain is susceptible to flooding during peak snowmelt — late May to early June — and can make for a wet ride or an occasional closure.

Know Before You Go: This trail is very busy especially during the summer weekends and holidays. Anticipate a large number of other bikers, runners and hikers on this popular trail. Also expect to encounter people stopped along the trail. Do not ride at excessive speeds especially in Ten Mile Canyon where sight distances are often reduced. Check weather forecasts before starting your ride. Weather conditions change quickly within Ten Mile Canyon and on Vail Pass. Occasional snow is even possible into June.

Parking: From I-70 take the west Frisco exit 201 to Main Street; the bicycle park and ride is on the right-hand side of Main Street immediately east of I-70. Parking is also available at the Vail Pass rest stop located near the summit of the pass on the south side of I-70 and at the Wheeler Flats Trailhead by Copper Mountain.

Description: Follow the paved recpath from Frisco, along what was once the Denver, South Park and Pacific narrow gauge railroad grade through Ten Mile Canyon to Copper Mountain Resort. The bike route continues along the paved bike lane on Copper Road. The paved recpath resumes at the other end of the resort adjacent to I-70 and parallels the highway to the summit of Vail Pass — often dipping well below the interstate and into a pleasant valley.

Additional trail information is also available in the free annual Explore Summit County Bike Guide.

Summit County Bike Trails: Illinois Creek area

June 21, 2014 — 

Throughout the summer the Summit Daily will be running weekly mountain bike and recpath trail guides from our annual Explore Summit County Bike Guide every Friday and Saturday. The rides will be a mix of dirt trails, singletrack and paved roads from across Summit County.

Great for a quick trail ride from downtown Breckenridge, the Illinois Creek Trail system provides a number of short loops as well a connection to the Blue River Trail. Located behind the Steven C. West Ice Arena, the trail system is a short ride from Main Street and typically rideable June to October. It includes minimal elevation gain, making it a good warm up for anybody new to the area or just looking to get a short ride in.

Know Before You Go: The Illinois Creek Trail System is located on an area of land just behind the Stephen C. West Ice Arena, off Boreas Pass Road, on the east side of Hwy 9. Maps of this trail system are available from the town of Breckenridge Open Space and Trails Department (970) 547-3155 located at Breckenridge Town Hall or at area bike shops.

Parking: Parking for the Illinois Creek Trail system is available at the Stephen C. West Ice Arena on Boreas Pass Road.

Description: The Illinois Creek Trail System provides a low-level ADA loop around the ice rink along the river bank, which now serves as an interpretive loop and historic park associated with the Rotary snowplow. Although the Illinois Creek Trail System is relatively short, numerous loop opportunities are available throughout it. To add mileage the main loop can link to the Blue River Trail.

Summit County Bike Trails: Illinois Creek area

June 21, 2014 — 

Throughout the summer the Summit Daily will be running weekly mountain bike and recpath trail guides from our annual Explore Summit County Bike Guide every Friday and Saturday. The rides will be a mix of dirt trails, singletrack and paved roads from across Summit County.

Great for a quick trail ride from downtown Breckenridge, the Illinois Creek Trail system provides a number of short loops as well a connection to the Blue River Trail. Located behind the Steven C. West Ice Arena, the trail system is a short ride from Main Street and typically rideable June to October. It includes minimal elevation gain, making it a good warm up for anybody new to the area or just looking to get a short ride in.

Know Before You Go: The Illinois Creek Trail System is located on an area of land just behind the Stephen C. West Ice Arena, off Boreas Pass Road, on the east side of Hwy 9. Maps of this trail system are available from the town of Breckenridge Open Space and Trails Department (970) 547-3155 located at Breckenridge Town Hall or at area bike shops.

Parking: Parking for the Illinois Creek Trail system is available at the Stephen C. West Ice Arena on Boreas Pass Road.

Description: The Illinois Creek Trail System provides a low-level ADA loop around the ice rink along the river bank, which now serves as an interpretive loop and historic park associated with the Rotary snowplow. Although the Illinois Creek Trail System is relatively short, numerous loop opportunities are available throughout it. To add mileage the main loop can link to the Blue River Trail.

Summit County Bike Trails: Tiger Road is a gateway to a network of singletrack

June 13, 2014 — 

Throughout the summer the Summit Daily will be running weekly mountain bike and recpath trail guides from our annual Explore Summit County Bike Guide every Friday and Saturday. The rides will be a mix of dirt trails, singletrack and paved roads from across Summit County.

Tiger Road north of Breckenridge provides a number of trail riding opportunities, starting with the road itself. When there’s still snow and mud at higher elevations, Tiger Road is a great place to start.

The smooth dirt road provides scenic, easy cruising along the lower Swan River Valley. Higher up, the valley splits into three mountain drainages containing rugged jeep roads that explore remote meadows and remains of historic mining communities.

Summit County’s renowned stretch of the Colorado Trail is also accessible from Tiger Road.

Know Before You Go: A great early-season spin, Tiger Road is always dry enough to ride by April. This area is easily accessed from Breckenridge by riding the paved recpath north from town. Expect vehicle traffic on Tiger Road and some jeeps in the upper drainages. Private property (including many fragile mining structures) is common in this area; respect all “No Trespassing” signs and view historic buildings from a distance. Spurs branching off the upper jeep roads offer hours of additional exploring. To shorten the distances on the forks of the Swan rides, park just beyond the old Tiger Townsite, 2.3 miles farther up the road.

Parking: From I-70, drive through Frisco on Hwy. 9 and continue south toward Breckenridge for about 5 more miles. Turn left onto Tiger Road (by the Breckenridge Golf Course) and drive up 2.6 miles. Park on the left in a small parking area near a pond containing remains of a historic dredge boat (across the road from a log fence).

Description: Begin riding up Tiger Road. A gradual climb over smooth terrain makes it easy to soak in the splendor of the nearby peaks. This area is in transition. There are some new homes, but also several older buildings remaining from when this valley was bustling with mining activity. Pass several side roads accessing private property. The road narrows, and at about 3.2 miles you reach a three-way junction for the North and South/Middle Forks of the Swan. This ride ends here. To continue farther, follow directions for the Three Forks of the Swan ride. Return as you came.

Additional trail information is also available in the free annual Explore Summit County Bike Guide.

Summit County Bike Trails: The Frisco Peninsula Trail System

June 14, 2014 — 

SUMMIT COUNTY — One of the county's most popular early-season mountain bike trail networks is the Frisco Peninsula.

For many Summit County residents the peninsula trail system is the first place to go when the snow melts in the spring. Typically the first to thaw out, it’s a great place to warm up for the season, get used to the altitude or just enjoy a trail quick trail ride next to Lake Dillon at any time during the summer. The network includes a number of short interconnected trails, so get out there and explore.

Know before you go: If the entrance gate is closed that usually means the area is too wet to ride. The trails are generally dry and ready to ride by mid-May. With a number of exposed sections due to tree removal, expect to be out in the sun. Don’t forget the sunscreen. Swimming is not allowed in Lake Dillon.

Parking: The Frisco Peninsula is accessible from three primary locations all off of Highway 9. From Interstate 70 or Breckenridge, take Highway 9 to Frisco. The peninsula sits right outside of the town of Frisco on the way to Breckenridge. Riders can park at the Frisco Adventure center, the peninsula day use area or the parking lot right off of Highway 9 just uphill from where the highway runs along Lake Dillon toward Breckenridge.

Description: The trails pass through stands of lodgepole pie and offer views of Lake Dillon and the Tenmile Range. Mountain bikes may only be used on trails marked with a mountain bike symbol. If there is no sign, it is closed to that use.

Additional trail information is also available in the free annual Explore Summit County Bike Guide.

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