Biking

Summit County Bike Trails: Frisco to Dillon & Keystone

October 29, 2013 — 

Following along both paved trails and roads, the section of the ride between Frisco and Dillon makes a pleasant, moderate ride on its own. This route provides great views of Dillon Reservoir, along with a scenic ride along the Snake River to Keystone Resort.

Know Before You Go: This route passes through a portion of the Keystone golf course. Please stay on the path and respect areas posted as restricted to bikes. Check out the new paved community pathway between the River Run Golf Course entrance and Summit Cove to access new singletrack trails at the golf course.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Dillon Reservoir

November 15, 2013 — 

Following a combination of paved trails and roads, this scenic route is a combination of shorelines, towns and marinas, along with a challenging ride over Swan Mountain Road.

Know Before You Go: Swan Mountain Road is a winding mountain road with an elevation gain of 500 feet that does not have paved shoulders. Be aware at times there is heavy vehicle and construction truck traffic on the road. Please use caution when riding along this 6-mile section of the route. The route is not advised for families with small children or bike trailers.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Frisco to Vail Pass

November 15, 2013 — 

The ride is a steady climb with steep grades and switchbacks approaching the top of the pass.

Know Before You Go: This trail is very busy especially during the summer weekends and holidays. Anticipate a large number of other bikers, inline skaters, and hikers on this popular trail. Expect to encounter people stopped along the trail. Do not ride at excessive speeds especially in Tenmile Canyon where sight distances are reduced. Check weather forecasts before starting your ride. Weather conditions change quickly within Tenmile Canyon and on Vail Pass.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Frisco to Breckenridge

November 15, 2013 — 

Following along sections of the Blue River between the Town of Breckenridge and Frisco, this paved recreation trail is a popular route for cyclists and inline skaters.

Know Before You Go: There may be construction in areas along this recpath – use caution in these areas. This trail is one of the most heavily used sections of the Summit County Recreational Pathway System, especially during the summer weekends and holidays. Anticipate a large number of other bikers, inline skaters, and hikers on this popular trail. Expect to encounter people stopped along the trail. The trail crosses several roads and driveways that have vehicular and large truck traffic. Use caution when crossing these areas.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Peru Creek

November 15, 2013 — 

Peru Creek jeep road passes remnants of many impressive mines before ending in a scenic high alpine cirque.

Know Before You Go: This valley contains a lot of private land; respect all “No Trespassing” signs. The final section is above timberline; be prepared for weather changes. Expect jeep traffic, mainly on weekends. Most historic buildings are private and fragile; please view them from a distance.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Montezuma Loop

November 15, 2013 — 

Description: Follow the directions for the Webster Pass ride but turn right at the junction at 3.6 miles. Continue climbing on a road that gets progressively steeper and more rocky. Beyond Cashier Mine, the road switchbacks upward so intensely that walking is a necessity. From the high point on Teller Mountain, descend toward the Deer Creek drainage. At the first junction turn left and drop briefly until merging with another road that traverses the upper edge of the valley. A right turn here creates a shorter loop by descending along Deer Creek. To continue on the described route, turn left and climb above the drainage to a 3-way junction at 6.5 miles. Turn right and follow the ridge top road toward Sts. John. (The left fork drops to the Middle Fork of the Swan.) Short, steep climbs and technical descents characterize the next few miles. Pass a spur on the left at 7.2 miles (it descends to the North Fork of the Swan). Approaching Glacier Mountain you pass a fork on the right. Continue straight (left) and ride/walk several steep pitches. The road veers right and passes the precariously placed General Teller Mine at 9.7 miles. Climb over a ridge on the main road and drop toward Sts. John Creek. A rock-filled descent brings you to treeline and past the Wild Irishman Mine. Continue winding downward into the valley on the main road. At about 12 miles, you’ll ride through the historic town of Sts. John. The last couple of miles you pass several spur roads, but the main route remains easy to follow as it descends along the creek and switchbacks down to Montezuma.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Webster Pass

November 15, 2013 — 

Description: Ride up Montezuma Road, the main road through town. Turn left at almost a mile onto a rocky jeep road at the sign for Deer Creek/Webster Pass. Begin climbing, passing several spurs leading to private property. Pass through a gate at 1.7 miles and climb into a beautiful high alpine valley surrounded by towering peaks. Cross the Snake River and climb over rough terrain to a junction at 3.6 miles. The right fork climbs to Teller Mountain (see the Montezuma Loop ride). Turn left and begin the final, moderate climb to Webster Pass. Although the road continues many miles down to Hwy 285, you’ll probably want to return as you came.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Frey Gulch

November 15, 2013 — 

Easily accessed from Keystone, this loop travels along the lower slopes of Tenderfoot Mountain and up aspen-lined Frey Gulch.

Know Before You Go: This early-season ride is usually dry by June and sometimes even in late May. Expect horse traffic from Keystone Stables. Always pull over and let them pass. Frey Gulch is full of colorful aspens during fall.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Keystone Gulch

November 15, 2013 — 

Keystone Gulch Road climbs gradually along a lively stream near the base of Keystone Mountain. Options further up the drainage include a challenging climb to North Peak and a loop combining abandoned logging roads and the West Ridge section of the Colorado Trail.

Description: Begin pedaling up Keystone Gulch Road. Novices will enjoy the first few miles of this well-maintained dirt road. It climbs gradually along a meandering stream and through a shady forest. Wind along the base of the ski area, passing two chairlifts. At 4.5 miles, near the third chairlift, the road veers left and begins climbing more steeply. Novices may want to turn around here. To reach North Peak, ascend steadily for a couple of miles. At about 6 miles (just before the top), there’s a fork to the right near a gate. Either continue straight to North Peak and the Outpost Restaurant, which is usually open for lunch, or, for more exploring, turn right onto the side road. Climb over rocky terrain for a little over a mile to the scenic Erickson Mine. This historic structure is private and fragile; please view it from a distance. Since this side trip is mainly above timberline, make sure the weather is good before you head out.

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Summit County Bike Trails: West Ridge

November 15, 2013 — 

Description: Follow the directions for the beginning of the Keystone Gulch ride. Just after that ride veers left near the third chairlift at 4.5 miles and begins climbing toward North Peak, turn right onto a road near a maintenance building. Climb along a hillside for almost 0.5 miles, crossing two ski runs. At about 5 miles, take a spur road on the right (the main road dead ends further up South Peak) that drops to a meadow and crosses a stream. Climb along an abandoned logging road, which switchbacks upward. After a long level section, you reach a 3-way junction at 6 miles. (For a shorter, easier loop, turn right and descend back to Keystone Gulch.) To reach West Ridge, stay left and continue climbing. Several abandoned side roads along this section may be confusing, but the main route remains fairly obvious. After a switchback to the left, the road narrows and eventually becomes a single track that climbs to connect with the Colorado Trail at 6.8 miles. Turn sharply right onto the Colorado Trail and meander along West Ridge. Anticipate other trail users on this route. Use caution around blind corners and expect to yield. At about 8 miles, you’ll reach a side trail on the right. Take this spur (see the Colorado Trail ride for a description of the rest of the Colorado Trail) and descend to another logging road. Turn right for a long descent through a series of switchbacks. At the bottom, cross the creek (which can be a challenging wade until mid-July), turn left onto Keystone Gulch Road and descend to your vehicle.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Oro Grande Trail

November 15, 2013 — 

Following an aspen-covered hillside above Dillon Reservoir, this ride offers panoramic views of the Ten Mile and Gore ranges.

Know Before You Go: The rolling terrain is great for novices and is usually dry by mid-May. Large stands of aspen also make this an excellent fall choice. This ride can be shortened to a 6-mile loop by turning right onto a dirt road at about 2.3 miles, following it past the cemetery to Hwy 6, crossing the Hwy and accessing the paved recpath, which takes you back to Dillon. You may encounter ATVs and motorcycles, as this trail allows motorized uses.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Colorado Trail to Searle/Kokomo Pass

November 15, 2013 — 

Following a section of the Colorado Trail, this challenging singletrack climbs two scenic alpine passes.

Know Before You Go: Avoid this trail during early summer when wet; sensitive soil can be easily damaged by bikes. It should also be avoided after significant rainfalls. Anticipate other bikers, hikers, and heavy guided equestrian traffic on this popular trail. Expect to yield and use caution around blind corners, especially when descending. Much of this ride is above timberline; be prepared for rapidly changing weather.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Miner's Creek

November 15, 2013 — 

Providing quick access to the backcountry near Frisco, Miner’s Creek Road winds past beaver ponds and a meandering creek as it climbs toward the Tenmile Range.

Know Before You Go: The part of the road described in this ride is usually dry enough to ride by early June, although the creek crossings will have high water. There’s some fun exploring on the several side roads in this area. Expect some jeep traffic.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Shrine Pass and beyond

November 15, 2013 — 

Starting from Vail Pass, this ride provides a good exploration of the Shrine Pass area and its peak-filled vistas.

Know Before You Go: Some of the riding is at or above timberline; be prepared for changing weather conditions. The first couple of miles of Shrine Pass Road are good for families except on weekends when vehicle traffic can be heavy.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Mayflower Gulch

November 15, 2013 — 

A well-maintained dirt road accesses a beautiful mountain cirque dotted with cabins, mining relics and fields of wildflowers.

Know Before You Go: Respect all private property at the beginning and end of this ride. Most historic buildings are private and fragile; please view them from a distance. Some of this ride is above timberline; be prepared for rapidly changing weather.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Gold Run Road

November 15, 2013 — 

A maintained jeep road travels through Gold Run Gulch, past the Preston townsite and over Gibson Hill for a close-up glimpse of many well-preserved mining remains.

Know Before You Go: This area is usually the first to lose snow around Breckenridge and is often rideable by June. Large aspen groves also make this an excellent fall ride. Numerous side roads may make route finding a challenge and also provide some additional exploring. However, much of the land is private. To avoid endangering future access in this region, please respect all “No Trespassing” signs. Changes from this description may occur if development and road improvements continue on private lands in this area. Expect occasional jeep traffic. Most historic buildings are private and fragile; please view them from a distance.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Tiger Road

November 15, 2013 — 

A smooth dirt road provides scenic, easy cruising along the lower Swan River Valley. Higher up, the valley splits into three mountain drainages containing rugged jeep roads that explore remote meadows and remains of historic mining communities.

Know Before You Go: A great early-season spin, Tiger Road is always dry enough to ride by April. This area is easily accessed from Breckenridge by riding the paved recpath north from town. Expect vehicle traffic on Tiger Road and some jeeps in the upper drainages. Private property (including many fragile mining structures) is common in this area; respect all “No Trespassing” signs and view historic buildings from a distance. Spurs branching off the upper jeep roads offer hours of additional exploring. To shorten the distances on the forks of the Swan rides, park just beyond the old Tiger Townsite, 2.3 miles farther up the road.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Three forks of the Swan River

November 15, 2013 — 

North Fork Description: Follow the directions for the Tiger Road ride. At the 3-way junction at 3.2 miles, turn left on the North Fork Road. Ride along the left side of meadow, through a gate and into the trees. A short distance further, turn (left) onto a side road where the main road curves right and crosses the river. Begin climbing more steeply over sometimes rocky terrain. Connect with the main road again after about a mile and continue up the left side of the drainage. Continue straight past a gated spur on the left. The road narrows, climbs several short, steep pitches through dense forest and reaches some dilapidated cabins in a small opening at about 5.5 miles. Continue climbing, now over more challenging terrain. As you near timberline the valley widens, mountains appear and collapsed buildings marking the old Rexford townsite dot the hillside. Climb over rocky terrain into a spectacular high alpine cirque. Turn around at the 3-way junction near a stream. Both spurs dead-end shortly beyond this point.

South Fork Description: Follow the directions for the Tiger Road ride. At the 3-way junction at 3.2 miles, turn right toward the South/Middle Forks. Pass some private property and at the next junction, turn right and cross the river. Veer left and climb gradually into the trees. At about 4.7 miles, reach a major 4-way junction near mining remains. Turn left, cross the river and climb more steeply along the left side of the drainage. Beyond a house the road becomes quite rocky as it passes some spurs on both the left and right. Ford the river at almost 6.7 miles and take either fork (they connect again shortly) up the first of many steep, technical pitches. Beyond a gate, pass two spurs on the right, then turn sharply left and drop into a meadow. More steep climbs that may require walking bring you to Georgia Pass for a well-deserved rest. Roads head in all directions – some dead-end, another accesses the Colorado Trail and also traverses along Glacier Peak to connect with the Middle Fork Road, and the main road heads down to Jefferson and Hwy 285. Return as you came.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Colorado Trail

November 15, 2013 — 

Following a beautiful section of the Colorado Trail, this loop explores forested hillsides above the Swan River Valley.

Know Before You Go: This trail is quite rideable in the opposite direction and also can be split into three shorter loops by parking either at the dredge boat parking lot, 2.6 miles up Tiger Road or near the old Tiger Townsite, 4.8 miles up Tiger Road. Use either the North Fork Road or Horseshoe Gulch Road as connections back to your vehicle. The 6-mile loop following the Middle Fork Road and the first section of the trail is the easiest. If you use Horseshoe Gulch Road, park at the Dredge Boat Parking Lot, and follow the trail that leads to two newly constructed bridges. Turn left after the second bridge to reach Horseshoe Gulch Road. Please stay on the trail, as all surrounding land is private and you will be trespassing if you wander. This trail is maintained entirely by volunteers, who provide feedback to the Forest Service and Colorado Trail Foundation about the trail’s condition. Please ride responsibly so comments regarding cyclists are positive and the trail remains open to them. Also, anticipate other cyclists, hikers and horsemen on this popular trail. Expect to yield and use caution around blind corners, especially when descending. Expect traffic on Tiger Road.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Sallie Barber Mine

November 15, 2013 — 

This scenic loop explores some of Summit County’s historic regions including Sallie Barber Mine, a well-preserved structure perched on a ridge above French Gulch.

Know Before You Go: Expect traffic on lower French Gulch Road, which is surrounded mainly by private land for the first few miles. Please respect all “No Trespassing” signs. Most historic buildings are private and fragile; please view them from a distance. Beautiful stands of aspen in French Gulch make this a spectacular fall ride.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Wheeler Trail

November 15, 2013 — 

This section of the historic Wheeler National Recreation Trail contains a challenging ascent and descent over the scenic Tenmile Range.

Know Before You Go: Much of the Wheeler Trail is above timberline. Get an early start and be prepared for weather changes. When riding within the ski area, stay on routes designated for biking.

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Summit County Bike Trails: French Gulch

November 15, 2013 — 

This well-maintained dirt road travels through historic French Gulch, passing many fascinating mining remains before becoming a rugged track that climbs steeply to a remote mountain pass.

Know Before You Go: Lower French Gulch Road (up to the Sallie Barber Mine Spur) is often dry enough to ride by April. And the first 6.5 miles of this ride are easy, recommended for novices and usually free of snow by mid-June. Just the last couple of miles to the pass require advanced skills (and are only dry from July through September). Expect traffic on Lower French Gulch Road, which is surrounded mainly by private land for the first few miles. Please respect all “No Trespassing” signs. French Pass is above timberline; be prepared for rapidly changing weather. Most historic buildings are private and fragile; please view them from a distance. Beautiful stands of aspen make French Gulch a spectacular fall ride.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Boreas Pass

November 15, 2013 — 

Boreas Pass Road follows an abandoned narrow gauge railbed to scenic views and historic remains on the Continental Divide.

Know Before You Go: Well-maintained and gradual, this road is excellent for novices. When the gate near the trailhead is closed, the road is still snowy and wet. Cyclists should avoid this ride until the gate opens. Expect vehicle traffic, which can be heavy on weekends. Boreas Pass is above timberline; be prepared for changing weather.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Bakers Tank Loop

November 15, 2013 — 

An easy climb up Boreas Pass Road takes you to a hidden singletrack that descends through a dense pine forest.

Know Before You Go: When the gate near the trailhead is closed, Boreas Pass Road is still snowy and wet. Cyclists should avoid this ride until the gate opens. Expect vehicle traffic (especially on weekends) on the road, which is bordered by aspen groves, making it a spectacular fall ride. Although it may look dry at the beginning, the shaded trail takes a while to lose snow and should be avoided in early summer and also a day after heavy rains. This is also a great ride in the opposite direction.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Dyersville

November 15, 2013 — 

Once a busy mining camp, the now-abandoned Dyersville languishes near Indiana Creek and is accessed by a network of dirt roads including the Boreas Pass railroad grade and a rugged jeep road.

Know Before You Go: When the gate at the beginning of Boreas Pass Road is closed, the road is still snowy and wet and should be avoided until the gate opens. Expect vehicle traffic, which can be heavy on weekends, on Boreas Pass Road.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Spruce Creek Loop

November 15, 2013 — 

This short, challenging loop accesses several exploring options in the Spruce Creek drainage.

Know Before You Go: This ride can be lengthened by combining it with the Burro Trail ride. You can also explore several side roads and trails although the singletracks are steep, technical and very muddy in places and require some portaging. Expect some vehicles on Spruce Creek Road.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Blue River Pennsylvania/Indiana Loop

November 15, 2013 — 

The meandering Blue River Trail is great for polishing singletrack skills and can be combined with a rugged jeep road that explores two scenic drainages.

Know Before You Go: The Blue River Trail is entirely on private land; the landowners have kindly allowed access. Do not leave the designated route; you will be trespassing and jeopardizing future access. Expect other users on this popular trail. Less skilled riders may want to pedal only the Blue River Trail, which can be ridden as an out and back or made into a loop by using the Hwy. Although the trail is usually dry by early June, the upper loop won’t be snow-free until later in the month.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Burro Trail

November 15, 2013 — 

This gradual but often rocky trail climbs along creeks and through dense forest to the Spruce Creek drainage.

Know Before You Go: This trail can be crowded with hikers and cyclists, especially on weekends. Expect people at blind corners and be prepared to ride slowly and yield frequently. Although it may look dry at the beginning, this shaded trail takes a while to lose winter snow and should be avoided in early summer and also for a day after heavy rains. Although elevation gains are moderate, several very rocky sections require some technical riding ability.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Barney Ford-Juniata Loop

November 15, 2013 — 

Providing immediate access from the town of Breckenridge, this loop climbs from Carter Park up to Sallie Barber Road then descends on a fun singletrack back to town.

Know Before You Go: The Barney Ford and Juniata Trails are mostly located on easements across private property. Please stay on the designated trails to avoid trespassing.

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Summit County Bike Trails: Illinois Creek Trails

November 15, 2013 — 

Know Before You Go: The Illinois Creek Trail System is located on an area of land just behind the Stephen C. West Ice Arena, off Boreas Pass Road, on the east side of Hwy 9. Maps of this trail system are available from the town of Breckenridge Open Space and Trails Department (970) 547-3155 located at Breckenridge Town Hall or at area bike shops.

Parking: Parking for the Illinois Creek Trail system is available at the Stephen C. West Ice Arena on Boreas Pass Road.

Description: The Illinois Creek Trail System provides a low-level ADA loop around the ice rink along the river bank, which now serves as an interpretive loop and historic park associated with the Rotary snowplow. Although the Illinois Creek Trail System is relatively short, numerous loop opportunities are available throughout it. To add mileage the main loop can link to the Blue River Trail.

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