Opinion Columns, Columnists

Subberwal: Don't know what you've got till you're gone (column)

July 27, 2016 — 

Since college ended in June, I’ve been on the move, never staying in one place for more than two weeks. I’ve been lucky enough to travel to places like New York, Chicago and Yellowstone National Park along the way, but now, finally, I get to go back home.

Home has always been something of a nebulous concept for me. Since first grade, home has meant Summit, and, more specifically, a handful of regular hangouts along Frisco Main Street and Summit Boulevard, with occasional more exciting ventures further afield. These places were where I was physically, but my mind was always elsewhere. I dreamed of big cities, of being at the center of the action. I thought there was somewhere I was meant to be, and my home was just somewhere I happened to exist at the moment.

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Liddick: Decoding Citizen Kaine (column)

July 25, 2016 — 

So it’s Tim Kaine. Hillary has chosen the junior senator from the swing state of Virginia as her running mate, hoping that the colorless if congenial Democrat apparatchik who has never lost an election will help drag her across the finish line in November.

It’s an illuminating choice — and not just for the senator’s avuncular persona. It’s another piece of the machine, another step in the Democrat party’s march toward totalitarian Progressivism. This one smiles nicely, true — but the punishment cells are there behind the eyes nonetheless.

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Support Summit Community Care Clinic's mission to help uninsured (letter)

July 24, 2016 — 

Now is a critical time for the Summit Community Care Clinic (SCCC).

Due to the increase in uninsured people in Summit County caused by rising insurance rates, the clinic is facing a significant financial struggle, which could affect the types of programs they can offer and the number of people they can help.

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Bucks: Federal coal leasing needs a major overhaul (column)

July 24, 2016 — 

The winds of change are blowing hard across our Western coalfields.

Competition from cheaper fuels such as natural gas, wind and solar has dampened domestic demand for coal. This trend — plus a bust in export markets after a brief boom — has driven five major coal companies into bankruptcy court. There, they seek protection from their creditors in order to “reorganize” by cutting costs and shedding debt.

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Eyewitness of North Pond drowning reflects on suicide and healing (column)

July 23, 2016 — 

July’s full moon was slowly slipping between Buffalo Mountain and Red Peak in the pre-dawn hours this past Wednesday. Snapping the new red telephoto gadget onto my iPhone, I went to the banks of North Pond in Silverthorne to try to capture this magical moment. Movement and a loud thrumming startled me. A hummingbird flew inches from my face, assessing whether the red ring of the lens offered a meal.

The previous evening Scot A. McChesney’s body had been recovered from North Pond after an exhaustive, pain-staking, and, at times, frustrating search by Summit County Search & Rescue. A search had commenced days earlier, moments after Scot took his life just before 5 p.m. on Sunday.

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Biff America: Nature in the hood

July 23, 2016 — 

Though they are wild, we gave them cute names — Butch, Scrappy and Pecker-head. Along with the forenames we have assigned personalities. Butch is skittish, Scrappy is sweet and Pecker-head hates his name.

Since arriving back in the High Country we’ve been spending most evenings sitting in the money pit we call our garden watching the sunset and unwinding after a hard day of unwinding. In early June we wore down-jackets but it’s now July and we have since switched to down-vests.

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Walking Our Faith: A mission statement (column)

July 23, 2016 — 

“As the deer pants for streams of water, so my soul pants for you, O God. My soul thirsts for God, for the living God. When can I go and meet with God?”

This familiar Bible verse from Psalm 42 is one of my favorites. When I ran across it this morning during my daily time with God, the column that I’d planned all week flew out the window. I got up, went to my computer, and knew I had to share this with you, instead.

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Marine: Pokémon Go takes over the Summit (column)

July 19, 2016 — 

It was 9 p.m. on a Saturday night, and I was running through Rainbow Park in Silverthorne. My phone illuminated the gotta-catch-them-all look in my crazed eyes.

What else was a 24-year-old supposed to do on a Saturday night?

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Liddick: Colorado housing looks like a duck and quacks like a duck (column)

July 18, 2016 — 

Now another lesson in basic economics, this one from the thriving metropolis of Duckburg.

Duckburg is a fine place to live, on the whole. Beautiful scenery, nice layout, vibrant cultural life, bustling economy, decent schools, healthy lifestyles on all sides. People are excited to move there, so it is home to a rapidly growing population – which began to create trouble in paradise.

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McGahey: The buck stops where? (column)

July 16, 2016 — 

Eight years ago a candidate for president looked us in the eye and told us exactly what we wanted to hear. He had a big smile, a handsome face and a silver tongue which he used to cash in on our collective insecurities. He looked us in the eye and promised to fundamentally transform America into a fairer, cleaner, more perfect place with equal outcomes derived from a government that would be the most transparent, the least corrupt and would serve We The People like no other before it. It sounded great, but then socialism always sounds great until you run out of someone else’s money.

Unfortunately, it was all a pack of lies, except for the part about fundamentally transforming America. That part he meant; his liberal political ideology was transformational, but not in the way he led us to believe.

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Biff America: Tragedies and skin conditions

July 16, 2016 — 

I’ve found the best way to deal with a horrific situation is to ignore it.

Case in point, last Monday I had two choices, give attention to a ghastly summer of violence, intolerance and ignorance or… go on a bike ride. Yes it helps that none of the horrors of hate occurred in my zip code but rather France, Florida, Texas, Louisiana etc. But that said no locale is exempt from the anger that seems to be scorching in our planet.

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Ask Eartha: Conserve energy starting at home

July 15, 2016 — 

Dear Eartha,

I read an article recently about the Partners in Energy program. Can you tell me more about it? What are some actions that I can take as an individual to contribute to the success of the initiative?

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Walking our faith: Faith and trust and the deep blue sea (column)

July 15, 2016 — 

I used to believe that life was a diving board. We walked along this straight and narrow course until we reached the end. The pool beneath us was Heaven. Cool, comforting, protected waters in which we would swim for eternity, held in the steady palm of God’s hand.

In fact, I liked that analogy so much, I used it in a novel.

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Subberwal: Millenials have technology anxiety too (column)

July 13, 2016 — 

We know we have a problem. Every day, there’s a new headline. “Science Says Your Cell Phone Use Could Be Hurting Your Relationship.” “Teens spend a ‘mind-boggling’ 9 hours a day using media, report says.” “The Internet May Be Changing Your Brain In Ways You’ve Never Imagined.”

When you glance around a crowded airport terminal, like I am doing now, and see a sea of people looking down at their screens, it is easy to envision a future of phone-zombies, melded to their devices and never interacting with another human again. And how could you not catastrophize, with the daily warnings of the mind-rotting power of the internet, warnings of a coming generation with a like addiction and a complete dearth of social skills?

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Brown-Wolf: New places to write (column)

July 13, 2016 — 

On mother’s Day, my husband helped me transform an old shed into a writing space. It has heat and electricity but no running water. It’s also musty, dusty and not insulated well.

Until a fellow writer sent me a link to she-sheds, sheds that women had transformed into personal spaces, I never considered renovating our dilapidated place. However, with three teenagers and their friends coming in and out of the house all summer, I needed a place — a place of my own that was quiet, if not inspirational.

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Liddick: The fix is in and that's how the republic falls (column)

July 11, 2016 — 

“the provinces ... distrusted the government … because of the rivalries between the leading men and the rapacity of the officials ... the protection of the laws was unavailing, as they were continually being deranged by violence, intrigue and finally by corruption.”

Thus, the historian Tacitus describes Rome on the eve of Octavian Caesar being declared “Augustus” by a supine Senate and given the powers he would use over the ensuing decades to slowly erase the Roman Republic, which had lasted half a millennium, only to end in a violent civil war provoked by exhaustion, petty jealousies, spite and avarice.

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Shannon: Comey and the FBI blink after email probe (column)

July 10, 2016 — 

FBI Director James Comey’s news conference on the conclusion of the Hillary Clinton investigation reminded me of another staged media event in a hostile environment almost 50 years ago.

During the Vietnam War, Commander Jeremiah Denton had been shot down on a bombing raid and was being held in a Hanoi prison camp. In May 1967, he was marched out by his captors to face a battery of television cameras. The goal of the propaganda event was to “prove” to gullible leftist journalists that the prisoners were well-treated in Hanoi.

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The Village at Breckenridge HOA board takes council to task (letter)

July 10, 2016 — 

Last month, disturbing news reached us of possible plans that you have to reverse the original plans that the town had to build a parking structure to service the south end of Breckenridge.

As you know, these original plans were developed from the results of the Breckenridge Parking Surveys conducted in December 2013 and March 2014, which included responses from over 2,300 participants, the OZ Architecture Feasibility Study and the recommendations of the Parking Task Force. These efforts culminated in the Congestion Relief Plan, anchored by a parking structure, as outlined in the town’ s press release of May 15, 2015.

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Biff America: Compassionate co-pilot

July 9, 2016 — 

Dave The-Jet drooled like a waterfall, had a limited vocabulary, and in the insensitive parlance of the mid-’60s, was ‘’retarded.” Point of clarification, for 2016, the correct term for Dave’s condition would be ‘developmentally disabled.’

I can only guess his age but safe to say he was probably in his late-teens when I was 8 or 9.

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Walking our Faith: How to live a life in full (column)

July 9, 2016 — 

The following is a journal entry from my mother, Adeline Marie Anderson:

“After Sunday School, a young woman came up to me and said, ‘Excuse me, but I want to tell you what an inspiration your smile is to me.’ Just when I thought at 88 years old, it was all over for me, my health is poor, I use a walker. I thought it was time for me to just sit back and let someone else carry the ball until that young girl spoke to me and then I discovered this verse: ‘Even in old age they will still produce fruit; they will remain vital and green. They will declare, “The LORD is just! He is my rock!”’ (Psalm 92:14)

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Ask Eartha: How to travel in style while keeping it sustainable (column)

July 8, 2016 — 

Dear Eartha,

Summer is a time for vacations, and I am taking a long one – 2 months to be exact. What are some ways I can save energy while I am away? Also, I will by flying, and I know that is heavy on the carbon emissions. How can I offset these emissions? — Gail, Breckenridge

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Linville: No one can manage wildfires anymore (column)

July 8, 2016 — 

It was midsummer in 2015, and the aircraft-dispatch board behind me was covered in scrawled phone numbers. Twenty-five aircraft managers were working the record-breaking fire season on the Idaho Panhandle, my first season as an aircraft dispatcher. Phones rang constantly, radios added their chatter and every computer screen displayed maps of fires, weather or the location of airplanes.

For the Idaho Panhandle National Forest, 2015 ranked as the biggest fire year since 1926. Decades ago, a large fire was anything over 500 acres. These days, 500 acres would be considered small, and it’s not unusual anymore to see a fire torch 4,000 acres in just a few hours. Recent history tells us there’s a new trajectory for wildfire — toward fires that no one can understand, predict or “control.”

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Littwin: On a bad day for Clinton, Trump still loses (column)

July 7, 2016 — 

FBI Director James Comey, whose reputation as a truth-teller was forever sealed when he served as deputy attorney general in the Bush administration, was the clear winner in the Hillary Clinton email story/scandal. In fact, he was pretty much the only winner.

Clinton lost, even as she was cleared of any illegality. In granting Clinton a reprieve, Comey still made a strong case that this scandal was different from all the Clinton faux scandals in that he — both a Republican and an Obama appointee — was not part of a vast right-wing conspiracy.

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Subberwal: Moving beyond our American rituals (column)

July 7, 2016 — 

After Halloween and Christmas, it’s one of the most fun days of the year. You get to put on your best red, white and blue and wait on the side of the road for strangers in colorful costumes to lob candy in your direction. Afterward, you and your friends can comb now-quiet Frisco Main Street for extra sweets lying among the torn streamers and popped balloons, and then you can retreat home to divvy up your loot with sticky fingers.

Until I was about 12, I basked in the free candy and conviviality the Fourth of July brought; I loved the feeling of collective effervescence, of knowing that we were on this journey together, marching into the future as a nation. But then I started to feel kind of bad about taking the candy that was intended for children a lot younger than me, so I was forced to consider the situation more thoroughly, to ask myself what the excitement was actually about.

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Mountain Law: What is a 'Rule 408' discussion? (column)

July 7, 2016 — 

Molly and Amy are involved in a legal dispute. Molly suggests to Amy that the two arrange a meeting to discuss a possible resolution. Amy says that she is willing to meet but only if it will be a “Rule 408” discussion. What is that and should Molly agree?

Rule 408 is a rule of evidence that applies in court proceedings. It basically prevents a person from presenting evidence of communications related to offers to compromise claims in order to show liability, invalidity or amount of a disputed claim. The rule reflects two legal principles.

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Liddick: Remembing the Declaration of Independence (column)

July 6, 2016 — 

Happy belated birthday, America. While we all shake off the excesses of brats, burgers, beer and baseball – with a side of wings and fireworks, permit me a question: What was July 4th about?

For most, an extra day off. For those unlucky enough to get the short straw, time-and-a-half. Some pleasant hours with family and friends. An opportunity to watch a parade with colorful cars and characters, surrounded by kids not yet old enough to be properly embarrassed by public hi-jinks undertaken by people who usually behave better. A little rest and relaxation.

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Biff America: Faith and appetite (column)

July 2, 2016 — 

It was raining in the Sierras. The ski season was winding down and the damp weather made the morning better suited for a leisurely breakfast than skiing slush. I hate seeing one person occupying a four top table when a restaurant is crowded; I didn’t want to be that person. When I saw what appeared to be a tourist looking around for a place to sit I invited him to join me.

He carried a breakfast burrito, as big as my head, a huge piece of gooey coffeecake and a blended drink served in a bucket. I made room for what I assumed would be a few people when he murmured, “I’m alone...Just hungry.”

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Walking our faith: Father Dyer's is Breckenridge's hometown church

July 2, 2016 — 

I’ve saved this profile of Pastor Claire McNulty Drewes and Father Dyer United Methodist church for the 4th of July weekend because the small town community spirit which surrounded me during the two services I attended reminds me of the best qualities of America: an optimistic spirit, a dedication to community service and a welcoming smile for newcomers.

The impetus might have been a series of sermons by Pastor Claire on the theme of baseball, or the people on either side of me who reached out and warmly held my hand during the benediction. After attending two services at Father Dyer, I went away thinking that anyone coming to Breckenridge could attend a service and not only feel right at home, but embraced by the community.

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Ask Eartha: Organic, natural — what's the difference? (column)

July 1, 2016 — 

Dear Eartha,

My wife insists that a product labeled “organic” is better than something labeled as being “natural.” Is there a difference, and is she right that one is better than the other? — Nigel, Breckenridge

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Subberwal: An open letter to those in power — tell us the truth

June 30, 2016 — 

To Whom it May Concern,

I hope you’re well, and I hope I’m not distracting you from your important tasks of balancing budgets and not starting wars. I have a problem I’d like to call to your attention.

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