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October 13, 2011
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Now showing in Summit

Showtimes: 1:15, 3:45, 6:30 and 9:15 p.m. today through Thursday at Skyline Cinema in Dillon

"Footloose," the 1984 rebels-and-rock musical that, along with "Flashdance," defined a generation, has been unnecessarily but energetically re-purposed for a new demographic cohort. The Sony Walkman Kevin Bacon memorably wore in the original has been supplanted by - what else? - an iPod, and his authority-flouting character, Ren McCormack, no longer partakes of the odd beer or cigarette. But, the occasional nip and tuck notwithstanding, director Craig Brewer has delivered a largely unobjectionable note-for-note facsimile of Herbert Ross' ode to teenaged rebellion, young love and the unfettered joy of movement. "Footloose" never needed to be dragged into the 21st century, but Brewer has made it look and sound a little bit more like the real world.

Showtimes: 1:15, 4:15, 6:45 and 9:15 p.m. today through Thursday at Skyline Cinema in Dillon

Take three gifted comic actors, put them in a situation rife with hilarious potential with the guy who directed "The Devil Wears Prada" and you get - baited and switched, at least in the case of "The Big Year." It's not that there's anything particularly wrong with David Frankel's adaptation of Mark Obmascik's book about competitive birding. In fact, there's a lot that's right with it, starting with the cast: Jack Black plays Brad Harris, a 30ish underachiever living with his parents in Baltimore; Steve Martin plays Stu Preissler, a wealthy tycoon who uses bird watching as a way to escape the torpor of retirement; and Owen Wilson plays Kenny Bostick, whose most recent Big Year - when birders try to see as many rare species as they can - racked up a record 732 sightings. Quiet, genial and mild-mannered to a fault, "The Big Year" has the virtue of being deeply un-cynical, but at the expense of propulsive vigor, structural elegance and behavior that's recognizably human as opposed to engineered in Hollywood. "The Big Year" has heart and sweetness to spare - but as any birder will tell you, focus and energy count, too.

Showtimes: 1:15, 3:45, 6:15 and 9 p.m. today through Thursday at Skyline Cinema in Dillon

At an Antarctica research site, the discovery of an alien craft leads to a confrontation between graduate student Kate Lloyd and scientist Dr. Sander Halvorson.

Showtimes: 1:15, 3:45, 6:30 and 9:15 p.m. today through Thursday at Skyline Cinema in Dillon

Set in the near future, where robot boxing is a top sport, a struggling promoter feels he's found a champion in a discarded robot. During his hopeful rise to the top, he discovers he has an 11-year-old son who wants to know his father.

Showtimes: 1:30, 4, 6:45 and 9:15 p.m. today through Thursday at Skyline Cinema in Dillon

Inspired by a true story, a comedy centered on a 27-year-old guy who learns of his cancer diagnosis, and his subsequent struggle to beat the disease.

Showtimes: 4 and 9 p.m. today through Thursday at Skyline Cinema in Dillon

Soon after moving into their seemingly idyllic new home, a family learns of a brutal crime committed against former residents of the dwelling.

In 2005, a baby bottlenose dolphin was injured when it became tangled in the ropes of a crab trap off Florida's Gulf Coast. Humans intervened. Over time, the dolphin - who picked up the name Winter - became an inspiration to countless people facing their own physical challenges. What a bonanza of poignancy the makers of "Dolphin Tale" had in this true saga of rescue, tenacity and recovery. Too bad the screenplay is often more artificial than the prosthetic tail Winter's human champions make for her. But it's not for lack of heart. Directed by Charles Martin Smith, "Dolphin Tale" honors the human-animal connection and delves into the psychology of loss. And it makes a thoughtful argument that a child's aptitude can take myriad forms.

Showtimes: 2, 5:15 and 8:30 p.m. today through Thursday at Skyline Cinema in Dillon

Some famously vexed studio projects stay vexed, from start to screen to box office. "Moneyball" - which had a bumpy journey toward completion - will not be one of them. The chief reason for this good news is Brad Pitt, who stayed in the game when it looked unwinnable. He portrays Oakland Athletics general manager Billy Beane. But Pitt, who has a producing credit, is not the sole reason this tremendous - yet intimate - sports tale soars over the fences. The bench is deep. And the script has a powerful but finessed swing. "Moneyball" is based on Michael Lewis' 2003 book about money's influence on major-league baseball and Beane's attempt to build a great team using statistical calculations championed by a guy named Bill James. The book's subtitle is "The Art of Winning an Unfair Game."

Showtimes: 1:45 and 6:15 p.m. today through Thursday at Skyline Cinema in Dillon

A Disney classic.

- Reviews from Washinton Post; summaries from imdb.com.


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The Summit Daily Updated Oct 13, 2011 05:38PM Published Oct 13, 2011 05:38PM Copyright 2011 The Summit Daily. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.