Erica MarciniecSpecial to the Daily

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March 8, 2013
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Breckenridge: Salvador Santana brings enlightenment, musical fusion to three20south

Bay Area artist Salvador Santana takes the stage at three20south in Breckenridge on Saturday night, bringing an original sound inspired by a lifetime of music. He started playing drums at age 3 under the guidance of his father - none other than legendary guitarist Carlos Santana, the 10-time Grammy-winning Hall of Famer. The younger Santana took a different direction, however, discovering a love for piano early on, which he developed into a mastery of keys. Also a vocalist, composer and songwriter, Santana describes his sound as "a new blend, an eclectic fusion." "My sound is definitely original," he said in an email. "At the same time, I also like to present some familiarity. You'll hear some hip-hop, rock, jazz, salsa/Latin, reggae, blues, R&B/soul." Following his 2008 project with the Salvador Santana Band, the artist released a solo debut, "Keyboard City," that allowed for collaboration with and inspiration from hip-hop legends Del Tha Funkee Homosapien, Beastie Boys producer Money Mark and GZA of the Wu-Tang Clan."I've always believed that 'two heads are better than one,'" Santana said of the collaboration. "With that said, I've also learned so many new things about myself and understanding my true capabilities as a musician. I'm very honored and grateful to have been able to recently work and collaborate with so many different artists. I hope that they've learned a thing or two from me like I've certainly learned from them."He describes his sound as "a little bit of everything - because that's what I basically grew up listening to - a little bit of everything." It's hardly a surprise, as Santana's musical lineage does not end at his father. His two grandfathers were blues great Saunders King and mariachi bandleader and violinist Jose Santana.Santana is currently touring his album while working on a new EP that picks up where "Keyboard City" left off. "Since then, I've learned and grown a lot as an artist and as an overall person," he said. "I believe fans and audiences can expect to hear my growth as a musician in my up-and-coming release. My only wish is that for those who take the time to listen - I hope that they will enjoy listening to it just as much as I've had fun creating it."At the Breckenridge show, concertgoers can expect songs from his past projects, as well as new material including "Mi Tesoro" and "Into The Light," which can be heard online at www.salvadorsantana.com. Now that the record is finished and he is touring, the musician has been donating a portion of profits to humanitarian causes, one of which is Daraja Academy (www.daraja-academy.org). "It's basically an all-girls school in Kenya that takes pride in teaching sustainable practices and more. These young girls are just simply incredible and have all qualities that are needed to become leaders of future generations," said Santana, who learned about the school and its founders, Jason and Jenny Doherty, through his mother's nonprofit organization, Do A Little (http://doalittle.org). "One of my favorite things about being in my line of work is the opportunity to be of service to people and to those in need," he said.As for Saturday's concert, he said, "Fans can totally expect a party-like atmosphere. My band and I are going to start off strong and finish even stronger. I just want people to basically dance and to celebrate. What better way to do it than through live music?" Teenage phenom Jaden Carlson opens; the concert is open to ages 21 and older.


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The Summit Daily Updated Mar 8, 2013 01:39AM Published Mar 8, 2013 01:36AM Copyright 2013 The Summit Daily. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.