NY Times best-selling author Eleanor Brown visits Next Page | SummitDaily.com

NY Times best-selling author Eleanor Brown visits Next Page

Eleanor Brown, New York Times best-selling author of “The Weird Sisters,” will be signing her new book, “The Light of Paris,” on Monday, Aug. 15 from 5–7 p.m. at Next Page Books & Nosh in Frisco.

NY Times best-selling author visits Next Page

Eleanor Brown, New York Times best-selling author of "The Weird Sisters," will be signing her new book, "The Light of Paris," on Monday, Aug. 15 from 5–7 p.m. at Next Page Books & Nosh in Frisco.

Brown's debut novel, "The Weird Sisters," was an Indie Next pick, an Amazon Best Book of the Month, and a Barnes & Noble Book of the Month and a Discover selection. Brown's writing has also appeared in newspapers, magazines, anthologies and journals, including The Washington Post, CrossFit Journal, Crab Orchard Review, and Publishers Weekly. She lives in Colorado and teaches and presents on writing at conferences and writing centers nationwide.

After "The Weird Sisters," Brown was searching for the right story to tell when the perfect seed for a story was dropped in her lap. One day while chatting with her parents about Jazz Age Paris, her father casually said, "Your grandmother lived in Paris in 1924." Naturally, Brown was intrigued, but when her mother added, "And we have all the letters she wrote to her family when she lived there," Brown's jaw dropped.

"It's one thing to stumble across a provocative real-life story in your own family," said Brown, in a statement. "Finding out you have direct access to something like actual personal correspondence takes it to a whole new level."

She dove right in, following her grandmother's journey to Paris by ship, visiting the places she recounted in her correspondence, and reading the books her daring grandmother did while there.

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One storyline in "The Light of Paris" is loosely based on her grandmother's true adventures in Jazz Age Paris, including her romantic liaison with a dashing French artist and her fiery defiance of her disapproving parents — something quite extraordinary among nice young ladies in 1924. The second storyline focuses on a promising 34-year-old artist who has ceded her creative life — her entire life, in fact — to a controlling, dispassionate spouse only to struggle to find the courage to reclaim it.

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