Join the Summit Reads discussion, contribute to the new seed library and more

Summit Reads hosts second book discussion

The 2014 Summit Reads Community Project is hosting the second book discussion on the committee’s book choice, “Getting Green Done: Hard Truths from the Front Lines of the Sustainability Revolution,” by Auden Schendler. All Summit County readers are invited to this free event at the Frisco County Commons Mount Royal Room on Wednesday, April 2, at 5:30 p.m.

“I will look to the audience to contribute thoughtful discussion points around the complex issues we all face,” said Dan Schroder, Summit County CSU Extension director, who is leading the book discussion. “Using the three pillars of sustainability, we will explore the environment, equity and economics as a tri-part synthesis of ways we can get green done.”

Schroder plans to ask questions during the discussion based on topics within the book to flesh out some of the opportunities available to local Summit County residents.

“We will explore how small steps can exert disproportionate influence over larger entities (paraphrased; page 93, ‘Getting Green Done’),” he said.

Copies of this year’s book, “Getting Green Done: Hard Truths from the Front Lines of the Sustainability Revolution,” are available at Summit County Libraries for $10 or to check out. In addition The Next Page bookstore in Frisco is selling the book. The Summit County Library, Summit County Rotary, Summit Daily News, CSU-Extension, The Next Page bookstore, Colorado Mountain College and the Holiday Inn sponsor Summit Reads.

Summit Seed Library launches Tuesday, April 1

Last summer, Emily Roesel, then a senior at Colorado Mountain College, approached Joyce Dierauer, director of Summit County Library, with the idea to create a seed library as her senior project in the CMC sustainability program. Roesel also met with Cassidy Callahan, High Country Conservation’s community programs coordinator, who agreed to work with Roesel on spearheading the project.

“The library was interested in Emily’s idea and began researching if other libraries had done a seed library in Colorado,” Dierauer said. “They had. Basalt Library completed a seed library last year and Steamboat Springs was hosting one this spring.”

Summit County Library decided to serve as the venue for the Summit Seed Library.

“I am so excited to see the Summit Seed Library to fruition,” Callahan said. “Saving seeds locally is the first step towards true food independence.”

According to Callahan, saving seeds is how farmers and gardeners were able to plant season after season before you could buy seeds at the store. By saving seeds from our best producing plants, we can select for properties suited to our mountain environment.

“Each year that we grow and save seeds in Summit County, the closer we get to developing our own varieties of vegetables,” she said.

The Summit Seed Library launch is Tuesday, April 1, at the Main Library in Frisco. Callahan will be present that day at the Main Library offering assistance on choosing seeds and sharing reading materials recommended for vegetable and garden varieties.

To view seed growing tips for Summit County, visit www.summitgardennetwork.org/local-food/seed-saving/. Email Callahan at cassidy@highcountryconservation.org with any questions about the Summit Seed Library, or call (970) 668-5703.

Summit County Library hosts April book sale

The Summit County Library will host its annual Summit County Friends of the Library Spring Book Sale on Friday, April 4, and Saturday, April 5, in the Frisco County Commons Mount Royal and Buffalo Mountain Rooms. There are no more crowded aisles when searching for the perfect book, CD books on tape or DVDs.

The book sale also will include a “Bag of Books” time from 3 to 5 p.m. on Saturday, April 5. The bags, donated by Weber’s Book Store, cost $3, or two bags can be filled for $5. Simply fill your bag to the brim with books, CDs, books on cassette tape and DVDs. The money generated from the book sale will provide much-needed funds for the libraries and is used to sponsor programs that benefit both residents and visitors in Summit County.

On Friday, April 4, pay $2 for hard cover books, DVDs and books on CD and $1 for paperbacks and books on cassette. On Saturday, April 5, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., all hard cover books are $1 and DVDs, books on CD, books on tape and paperbacks are 50 cents. Videos sell for 50 cents on Friday and for 25 cents on Saturday before 3 p.m.

More volunteers are needed to cover the expanded space. The library needs assistance for set up on Thursday, April 3, beginning at 3 p.m. and during the sale, which runs on Friday, April 4, from noon to 6 p.m. and Saturday, April 5, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. In addition, help is requested during the take-down process, which will begin promptly at 5 p.m. after the completion of the sale.

If you are available at any of these times and would like to help out your local library, call the Main Library at (970) 668-5555.

Summit quilters design community center quilt

Summit Quilters will host a quilting retreat Saturday, April 5, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Summit County Community and Senior Center.

“We hold monthly quilting retreats for various individual and group projects,” said Debbie Conway, of Summit Quilters. “We are working on the community center quilt this month.”

As their contribution to the new South Branch Library, the group has been working for months on the design and execution of a quilt that will have a place of honor in the new space. The quilters listened to the Summit County Library Board’s requests for the quilt design, and in turn, the group asked lots of questions. The quilters also brainstormed among their group on ideas and suggestions.

“Our group quickly decided to showcase the heritage of the old schoolhouse,” Conway said. “We started drafting the basic design and obtained the buy-in from the library board and the Breckenridge Public Arts Council, which made the process very collaborative among the various organizations.”

The quilters’ design represents both the past and future of the old schoolhouse in different ways. The building has architectural features such as the scrollwork. The bookshelf symbolizes the future use of the building as a library and the film reels represent the Speakeasy both the past and future use.

“We also added a seasonal representation to the quilt, with winter as the snow-capped mountains, autumn as the changing color of leaves on the trees, spring flowers in front of the building and summer’s green grass,” Conway said.

Founded in 1992, Summit Quilters was created to share ideas, knowledge, quilting problems and successes.

“We are open to anyone interested in quilting, young or old, man or woman, beginner or experienced,” Conway said. “We have about 25 active members, and about 20 quilters have worked on the Breckenridge Grand Vacations Community Center and South Branch Library quilt.”


Explore Related Articles

The Summit Daily Updated Mar 29, 2014 08:51PM Published Mar 29, 2014 11:42AM Copyright 2014 The Summit Daily. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.