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July 18, 2014
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A&E briefs: Dillon’s Chimayo Grill named one of Colorado’s best

The town of Dillon recently announced that one of its local businesses has been named to the list of the “Top 11 Restaurants Outside of Denver,” according to Thrillist Media Group. Chimayo is particularly known for its “fresh fish and shrimp tacos,” the listing said, concluding simply with, “It’s an easy decision if you’re in Summit County.”

“We are always the biggest fans of our local businesses,” said Mayor Kevin Burns, “but for Chimayo to receive such national press goes above and beyond what we strive for. And I agree with Thrillist’s sentiments. If you don’t believe me, I’ll meet you there for a fish taco any day of the week.”

“We were elated when we heard,” said Teresa Toczek, co-owner of Chimayo Grill. “We’ve always thought we offered a great product, and it feels great to be recognized for doing just that.”

Toczek, along with partner Frank Michaud, purchased the business in 2008 from the previous owners, who first threw open the doors a decade prior.

Minor tweaks to the menu were made, including the addition of Baja shrimp tacos, burritos, grilled fish and shrimp entrees.

Chimayo also boasts being Summit County’s only on-the-fly fish and shrimp taco restaurant. To see the menu or get more information, visit www.chimayogrill.com.

6th Alley Bar & Grill open at Arapahoe Basin

The 6th Alley Bar & Grill at Arapahoe Basin is open Saturdays and Sundays through Sunday, Aug. 31, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. for brunch or lunch. A-Basin’s self-described “19th hole,” it’s a perfect place to stop on those summer bike rides or after a hike up the Argentine-North Fork Trail.

The 6th Alley Bar & Grill is also available for private parties and events, accommodating approximately 100 guests on the first floor, with the second level available, if needed, at no additional charge. To learn more about the restaurant and rental opportunities, visit www.arapahoebasin.com.

Maroon Bells Birthday Bash is Aug. 2 at Aspen Highlands

People will be partying like it’s 1964 at Aspen Highlands Ski Area on Saturday, Aug. 2, when the Aspen community throws a 50th birthday party for its beloved Maroon Bells.

The iconic twin 14ers — said to be the most photographed mountains in North America — are a bit more than 50 years old, of course, but the golden anniversary that the event honors is the passage of the Wilderness Act of 1964. That landmark law established an initial handful of wilderness areas nationwide and has led to the protection of nearly 110 million acres, a good chunk of it in Colorado, including the Maroon Bells-Snowmass.

The Maroon Bells Birthday Bash will be a good-old-fashioned, family-friendly party, complete with cake and candles. The outdoor festival will run from 3 to 9 p.m. and will feature live music, an address by author-activist Rick Bass, a Ute Nation ceremony, kids’ activities and wilderness displays. The music lineup will include the Shook Twins, Paper Bird, Halden Wofford & the Hi-Beams and Let Them Roar.

Advance tickets are $10 for adults ($15 on the day of the event), with kids 12 and younger free. Parking is also free. The Highlands Alehouse will offer special food and drink deals. Tickets are on sale at www.maroonbells50.org, where you’ll also find lodging deals and adventure packages, as well as information about other “Wilderness 50” events and activities.

Native American powwow in Colorado Springs

The Palmer Lake Historical Society and One Nation Walking Together are sponsoring a one-day Native American Indian Festival and Traditional Powwow on Saturday, July 19, at the Freedom Financial Services EXPO Center, 3650 N. Nevada, Colorado Springs. The event is a traditional powwow, where American Indians from all tribes meet together to join in dancing, singing, visiting, renewing old friendships and making new ones.

This event is a celebration of Native history and culture and will include Native drums and dancers, Native art and artisans, live wolf and birds of prey exhibits and plenty of Native vendors and food. The event will provide the opportunity for non-Natives to learn and ask questions about Native American culture, history, dances and music.

Learn the meaning and significance of drums, songs and dances in Native traditions and culture and see the different regalia worn by dancers as they demonstrate some of the various Native dances. Native artisans will demonstrate their skills and exhibit their paintings, jewelry, beadwork and more. Sample Native food, such as Navajo tacos and fry bread.

Admission is $2. Native Americans in full regalia and children 12 and younger admitted free. Bring chairs, as seating is limited, and donations of nonperishable food to help feed the hungry. The event will be held from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., with Grand Entry at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. No drugs, alcohol or pets permitted.

Visit www.palmerdividehistory.org for more information.

Leadville announces Friday night events for the summer

Looking for something to do in Leadville? A slate of poetry, theater, music and fun is scheduled for the summer from 7 to 8 p.m. on Friday nights, hosted by Susan Fladager, Laurel McHargue, Stephanie Spong and Carol Bellhouse and in cooperation with Leadville Cherokee.

Admission to all events is free.

July 25: Readers Theater, St. George Church

Aug. 8: Acoustic Music Jam, Pastime Bar

Aug. 15: Poetry Slam, St. George Church

Aug. 22: Readers Theater, St. George Church

Aug. 29: Acoustic Music Jam, Pastime Bar

For information on any of these events, call (719) 486-1282.


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The Summit Daily Updated Jul 18, 2014 09:11PM Published Jul 18, 2014 04:00PM Copyright 2014 The Summit Daily. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.