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June 3, 2013
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Summit County parents welcome new pediatrician Adam Loomis

There were no first-day jitters for pediatric doctor Adam Loomis, who appeared calm and collected during his lunch break from High Country Healthcare in Frisco. Then again, it’s probably hard to ruffle a man with years of experience working with the mercurial temperaments of young children as well as a year-long stint in Iraq as a battalion doctor. When Loomis did show a change from his calm demeanor, it was to express his excitement at finally living in the mountains.

Motivated by medicine

A Colorado native, Loomis grew up in Highlands Ranch. His family would often come up to the mountains for vacation, particularly Frisco, where his parents own a townhouse. It was the beginning of a love affair with Summit County for the outdoor-active Loomis.

“I’ve spent a lot of time in Frisco,” he said. “I knew that I’d want to end up in a mountain community.”

Loomis graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Spanish from the University of Colorado at Boulder for his undergrad. For graduate school he attended the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Denver, then spent his residency in the Pacific Northwest at the Madigan Army Medical Center in Tacoma, Wash.

Inclination toward medical service runs in the Loomis family. His mother is a nurse practitioner and his father was a firefighter. However, Loomis chose his path for himself.

“They never pushed me to do anything, they really left it up to me to decide what I wanted to do,” he said, “but I think I was exposed to health care from a young age and I’ve always kind of gravitated towards the field.”

Loomis was drawn to the field of pediatrics by his interest in human development from the early stages.

“I chose pediatrics mostly because I like watching the development of the children,” he said. “I feel like, with a lot of specialties, you’re so specialized in (only) one area. In pediatrics, you get to be a specialist but you also get to deal with all aspects of the child and all aspects of illness.”

His interest in pediatrics goes beyond the scientific and physical elements of the craft.

“I love interacting with children and with their families,” he added. “I like watching them grow up and progress through the milestones and development.”

Military service

While his family doesn’t have any long-standing military traditions, Loomis felt that joining the Army in 2002 was the right thing to do.

“It was a good time to help serve our country and provide good care for the children of the soldiers,” he said.

As a pediatrician, Loomis served the children of military families living on or around military bases. After three years in Washington, he transferred to Kentucky, where he served as a pediatric hospitalist at Fort Campbell as well as Centennial Pediatrics in nearby Clarksville, Tenn.

In 2010, Loomis was assigned as a battalion doctor and sent to Baghdad, Iraq. Although trained as a pediatrician, “I was more of a battalion doctor, a doctor for soldiers,” Loomis said.

Deploying to Iraq and working in a different medical field wasn’t easy, but Loomis made the best of it.

“It was a very long, kind of a hard time, but it allowed me to grow as a person or as an individual,” he said. “It gave me a lot of time to read and study about medicine and pediatrics, so that part of it was good. I did a whole lot of trauma and mental health, behavioral health and also orthopedic injuries, so it gave me a lot of experience with that.”

In addition to working with the soldiers, Loomis was able to do some humanitarian aid work with the locals as well.

“The humanitarian missions were great. You see very different disease processes there, the people are very grateful for you coming and giving health care and helping them out so that part was wonderful,” he said, “and also to get out in the community and the city and just see everything, I enjoyed.”

Although he appreciated the extra medical practice and knowledge, working with the battalion made Loomis realize one thing.

“It definitely reaffirmed that I wanted to be in pediatrics,” he said.

Returning to the mountains

After Iraq, Loomis returned to Kentucky for three more years to finish out his Army service. His very next move was to look for a way to move back to Colorado.

“It was seven years away from Colorado and it definitely made me appreciate what I had here,” he said. “Being back in the mountains is an awesome feeling.”

Loomis has plenty of plans for his free time. When he’s not in the office, he’ll be out skiing in the winter and running, hiking and biking in the summer.

“That’s a big reason why I came here, versus the city,” he said.

Aside from the great recreational opportunities, Loomis is very much looking forward to becoming part of the community in Summit County.

“I like what Summit County has to offer,” he said. “It’s a small community, a very close-knit community. I feel like I’ll be more involved with the families and with the children, with more of a personal relationship with them.”

Loomis moved here with company — his wife of one year, Shae, and three dogs. Though the couple doesn’t have children yet, Loomis said he is looking forward to raising a family in Summit County.

Loomis also hopes to exercise his Spanish language skills and connect with the Spanish-speaking community as well.

There’s plenty of time for that, as he doesn’t plan on going anywhere else.

“I love it up here,” Loomis said, smiling. “Hopefully I’ll stay here forever.”


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The Summit Daily Updated Jun 4, 2013 09:07AM Published Jun 5, 2013 02:38PM Copyright 2013 The Summit Daily. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.