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A book to inspire gratitude

“This Is the Moment!” is an inspiring book that makes you think more about expressing appreciation for others in your life. However, at times, the idea of the book is more interesting than the actual content.

Author Walter Green was chairman of the board and chief executive officer of Harrison Conference Service, Inc., the nation’s largest conference center management company. After working there for 25 years, he sold his company and began thinking about the people who helped him and meant the most to him. He came up with a list of 44 people and decided to travel for a year, worldwide, to personally talk with all 44, in order to express his deepest gratitude.

People might think Green was facing death when he decided to take his tour, which he calls his “victory lap,” because it’s a celebration of people in his life. But that’s exactly the point of Green’s book: No one should wait until they’re dying to express gratitude and love directly – he didn’t. As he points out, we often express appreciation for people in our lives by talking about them to other people, rather than the actual person we love.

Before he visited his friends and family, he “forewarned” them, so to speak, by outlining his four-part plan: First, they’d reflect upon when they first met; second, Green wanted to evoke memorable life experiences they shared; third, Green would express his appreciation; and fourth, “for my self-enlightenment, I’d give each person a minute or two to present his or her perceptions of me.” Personally, the structure struck me as a bit formal and self-agenda-driven, but then again, Green was successful enough to build an empire, and the format does give readers an idea of how they might begin such a conversation with friends.

“This Is the Moment!” is worth reading because it’s quick and makes you reflect on gratitude and expressing appreciation of others. However, at times, the letters Green has written to express thanks and the notes of gratitude he includes from his friends about his “victory lap” seem as though they serve the writer more than the reader. Outside of that, Green has an authentic and approachable voice in his book.