Bomb threat suspect was former CMC student upset about grades, religious discrimination, police say | SummitDaily.com

Bomb threat suspect was former CMC student upset about grades, religious discrimination, police say

By Jack Queen jqueen@summitdaily.com

The man who allegedly called in a bomb threat to the Colorado Mountain College Leadville campus yesterday, 32-year-old Adam Slatterly, was a former student at the college who was last enrolled in the fall of 2016, CMC officials said.

Slattery allegedly called the school on Monday morning and said that was he was unhappy with his grades and would set off a bomb in the library if they weren't raised, Lake County Sheriff Rod Fenske said at a news conference on Tuesday.

According to an arrest affidavit, Slattery left the school multiple voicemails around 6:30 a.m. on Monday.

In one of them, he allegedly said, "I feel that (a professor) religiously discriminated against me in her class last semester and failed me wrongfully… I am really (expletive) furious."

In another voicemail left with student services, Slattery allegedly called pretending to be someone else and said that "Welseck" had planted an explosive device near the library. Slattery allegedly said that if "Welseck's" demands weren't met by the end of the semester, the device would be detonated in a "spectacularly safe manner."

Sheriff's deputies tried to arrest Slattery outside the library at around 9:30 a.m., but he allegedly started to resist and reached into his pocket where he had a large knife, the affidavit says.

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According to the affidavit, he hurt a deputy's hand while resisting efforts to handcuff him.

Slattery has been charged with false reporting of an explosive device, criminal extortion, resisting arrest, menacing and harassment.

Fenske said that he had remained uncooperative with law enforcement while being taken to jail but wasn't suicidal or placed on a mental health hold.

Slattery initially called the Glenwood Springs CMC campus, but law enforcement officer in Garfield County contacted the Lake County Sheriff’s Office after determining there was no danger there and that the threat was actually directed at the Leadville campus.

The lockout was issued at around 9:15 a.m. and roughly 106 people, including seven high school students enrolled in dual-credit programs, were evacuated to the cafeteria.

CMC vice president and Leadville campus dean Rachel Pokrandt, who was in the cafeteria with students, said that they were fed lunch and given hourly updates on the situation.

Students who live in the residence halls were convened at around 7 p.m. to get a final debriefing on the situation, Pokrandt said.

People with cars parked outside of the blast radius were gradually released during the lockout through an emergency rear-access road, but around 68 people remained in the cafeteria until the campus was cleared by a Colorado Springs bomb squad shortly after 6 p.m.

The investigation centered on Slattery's backpack, which was left in the library. The bomb squad didn't find any explosives in the bag, any of the other buildings on campus or Slattery's house in Leadville.

Fenske said that he didn't know what exactly was in the bag but told reporters that there was "nothing illegal" inside.

CMC officials said Slattery had been pursuing an associates degree in general studies but didn't comment on why he was no longer enrolled. The arrest affidavit suggests that he may have left due to poor academic performance.

Slattery has prior charges dating back to 2008 in Vail, Glenwood Springs and Leadville. Colorado Bureau of Investigation records indicate that he was charged in Leadville in 2014 with eluding police — a felony — obstructing a police officer, resisting arrest, reckless endangerment with a weapon, reckless driving, driving under the influence and disorderly conduct for an offensive gesture.

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