Silverthorne Town Council gains new member | SummitDaily.com

Silverthorne Town Council gains new member

Financial guru turned philanthropist, Kevin McDonald, returns to the Silverthorne Town Council to fill in for the rest of Peggy Long's term. The longtime Silverthorne resident is jumping into the council at an exciting time as the town has started moving forward with large scale projects on the downtown core and the Smith Ranch workforce-housing development.

McDonald grew up in Pittsburgh before moving to Broomfield with his family at the age of 12. He later graduated from Colorado State University with a degree in business administration. After that, McDonald jumped into a career at FirstBank in Vail in 1983.

In the 10 years that McDonald spent in Vail working for the bank he met his wife Cindi, a registered nurse who graduated nursing school in Wisconsin and quickly packed her bags for the Centennial State. She worked for Vail-Summit Orthopedics for 27 years.

"She's the smart one," McDonald joked.

The couple has two children, a son who is 27 years old, and daughter, 24.

McDonald later transferred to Summit County, where he was president of the Silverthorne branch of FirstBank. He moved over to Frisco once that branch opened.

But after 22 years in the banking business, it was time for a change of pace in 2005.

"The kids were still at home, and you can't spend more time with them, so I decided to switch gears and spent more time with family," McDonald said.

Since retiring from FirstBank, McDonald founded New Path Capital Advisors in Dillon with business partner Ronald Bristol in 2007. He also began to work with nonprofits in the county. He joined The Summit Foundation board in 2009, serving as the president for a few years starting in 2013.

As part of the board for The Summit Foundation, McDonald helped to review nonprofits applying for grants. He said part of what he enjoyed about being on the board was getting to know all the different organizations within Summit.

"I always need to be involved with a few things that are leading to some sort of positive change," he said. "It's nice to know that the people at the foundation are doing their homework and collaborating with the nonprofits and helping them succeed. That's a lot of fun being a part of that."

Honing his research skills at The Summit Foundation helped to prepare McDonald for his next adventure, as he joined the Silverthorne Town Council for one four-year term in 2006.

"You have to step up and serve if you have skills and talents and motivation, you should use them," he said.

McDonald said that many of the issues presented to town council can seem mundane, but then there are others that require a lot of research to ensure that council members see all sides of the story. He added that he liked to be as informed as possible before making decisions because some things didn't have a perfect solution.

McDonald will be sworn in again next Wednesday during Silverthorne's town council meeting. He is filling in for the remainder of Councilwoman Peggy Long's term after she moved out of the town's limits making her ineligible to serve. Elections will be held in April 2018, and McDonald can run during that time for a full term.

But McDonald thinks that this term will be different. He said that his first round in the town council was during the Great Recession, which limited the council's options.

In particular, McDonald said he's excited about Smith Ranch moving forward as a housing project. He was on the council when the property was first purchased, but was unable to move forward on a project due to costly construction and a lack of funds.

"Housing's a big deal for me. I've been dealing with that for 30 years, whether it's at the bank or council," he said.