This week in Summit County history: Lodes and placers produce splendidly | SummitDaily.com

This week in Summit County history: Lodes and placers produce splendidly

Compiled by Breckenridge Heritage Alliance

This week in history as reported by the Summit County Journal 100 years ago on July 14.

It is estimated that the gold output from the dredges for the month of June was slightly over $175,000. This is probably greater than for several months in the past. All the dredges are enjoying the privilege of large clean-ups. Number Three Dredge of the Tonopah Placers company is working rich ground in French gulch, near the home of F.A. Hunt, of the French Gulch Dredging Company. The latter company's dredge is operating in the same gulch, opposite the Wellington mine.

Number One dredge of the Tonopah Placers company is now working near the right-of-way, and will continue up the Blue River valley on the opposite side of the track from where they are now working. The Tonopah company has had a crew of men engaged during the past six weeks building a new county road along the west side hill, to take the place of the old road, which will be dredged. This ground is being tested by a Keystone drill, and the values evidently warrant the great expense of building new roads and the tearing up of the railroad.

Number Two dredge is working the ground of the Farncomb Hill Gold Dredging company, in the upper Swan valley. The value of this ground is greater now than at any time since operations were begun on it.

Blue Flag to Resume Operations

From all accounts, the Blue Flag Gold Mining and Milling company will soon resume operations on its property, in Illinois Gulch. The property has produced great quantities of lead ore, and it is thought by the management that during the high price of lead the mine can be worked at a good profit.

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The Blue Flag Gold Mining and Milling company is also operating in the Cripple Creek district. It has been several years since any work has been done on its Breckenridge property.

Brewer Building on the move

At a Special meeting held Monday night, the town Board instructed Town Attorney Kaiser to close a deal with Fritz Thiess for the Denver building, on the corner of Main Street and Lincoln avenue, which the town desires to remove from its present site in order to widen the street. The price asked and thus accepted is $1400.

Mr. Thiess is agent for the Denver heirs, who live in Germany, and can not be communicated with.

Mayor Alber advocates, and wisely so, that the building be moved farther back toward the river, turned to face the avenue, and converted into a town hall and clerk's office. He also proposes to move the town scales to the front of it.

Ten Miles in 14 Minutes

A new automobile speed record between Dillon and Breckenridge was established on Wednesday, when Harry Baron, of the former town, drove the ten miles to Breckenridge in fourteen minutes.

Mr. Baron had been at the Dillon station with his Studebaker car when the morning train came in, and had taken some ladies uptown. Then he drove to the Baron store and proceeded to back his car to the sidewalk in front of the store. In doing so, he happened to knock down and get a rear wheel on top of the ten-year-old Chauncey Warren, son of Mr. and Mrs. B.F. Warren.

Swiftly the little fellow was extricated, hustled into the car, and, accompanied by his aunt, Mrs. I.W. Blundell, with whom he had been making his home since babyhood, and hurried at the speed described to the office of Dr. C.E. Condon.

The physician found the boy severely bruised, but no bones broken. Signs of sickness, such as vomiting, caused some fear of internal injury, but the boy was soon taken home, and last reports from there are that he is recovering rapidly.

In return for the scare, Mr. Baron holds a speed record that will prove an asset in his capacity of agent for Studebaker cars.

Urges Miners Not To Strike

Denver—Governor Julies C. Gunter July 7 issued a proclamation addressed to the miners in the Leadville district calling upon them not to strike, pending adjustments of their dispute with the operators in the district. The proclamation points out that the National Congress is considering legislation to reduce the cost of food and that similar legislation will be taken up by the Colorado Legislature when it meets in special session July 18.

Take the tour

Iowa Hill Gold Miner’s Hike: A 1.5 mile guided hike tells the story of hydraulic mining-how gold was extracted from the surrounding hills using high-pressure water hoses. Authentic mining artifacts and a restored boardinghouse (c. 1868) provide a glimpse into miners’ lives. Reservations required by 6 p.m. Sunday for Monday’s 10 a.m. tour. Tickets may be purchased at breckheritage.com

Behind Swinging Doors Saloon Tour: Taste the spirits of the Breckenridge Distillery (when available) and learn about the historic saloons of Breckenridge at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, Friday and Saturday. Reservations required by 3 p.m. day of the tour.

Historic Walking Tour: Enjoy a guided walking tour through Breckenridge’s nationally recognized Historic District, 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., Tuesday through Sunday. Reservations not required.

Museums: Visit the Victorian home of Barney Ford, escaped slave and civic rights leader; take an interactive journey through Edwin Carter’s Discovery Center; visit the Sawmill Museum to learn how it was a part of frontier history; or learn about the early days of skiing at the Ski Museum. It’s all free and open from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.,Tuesday through Sunday.

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