Letters to the editor: Help support endangered gray wolves | SummitDaily.com

Letters to the editor: Help support endangered gray wolves

'Medicine' for 'War On Wolves'

Last month, U.S. congressmen introduced two bills to strip federal protections for endangered gray wolves in four states. H.R 424, specifically, has been dubbed the "War On Wolves Act."

As lawmakers again debate the fate of wolves, a recent award-winning documentary film is commanding renewed attention.

So please join our local Headwaters Group, Colorado Sierra Club, for a free screening and a Colorado Premiere of "Medicine of Wolf," a winner of the "Best Documentary" award at the Minnesota International Film Festival.

This thought-provoking and heart-rending documentary takes viewers on a journey into wolf country to investigate the intrinsic value of the wolf through the eyes of the renowned National Geographic contributor Jim Brandenburg. Dr. John Vucetich, director of the longest running wolf study in the world, is also interviewed and describes how science and politics have become opposing forces when it comes to wolves.

The free screening will start at 7 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 25, at the Colorado Mountain College Campus in Breckenridge. Doors open at 6:15 p.m. with refreshments and a meet and greet, followed by introductory remarks and a Q&A with Delia Malone, Wildlife Chair-Colorado Sierra Club, starting at 6:45 p.m. A $5 donation is suggested to help defray costs.

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A limited number of Colorado Premiere commemorative posters will be given away to lucky moviegoers; and also available for donations.

Brian Duchinsky

Frisco

Better off meat-free

March 1 marks the beginning of Lent, the 40-day period preceding Easter, when many Christians abstain from animal foods in remembrance of Jesus' 40 days of fasting in the wilderness before launching his ministry.

The call to refrain from eating animals is as old as the Bible. In Genesis 1:29, God commands humans to eat only plants; then Prophet Isaiah predicts that "none will hurt or destroy on God's holy mountain."

A number of Christian leaders have followed the call, including Methodist founder John Wesley, Salvation Army founders William and Catherine Booth, Seventh-day Adventist Church founder Ellen G. White, and prominent evangelical leader Franklin Graham.

A meat-free diet is not just about Christian devotion. Dozens of medical studies have linked consumption of animal products with elevated risk of heart failure, stroke, cancer and other killer diseases. A United Nations report named meat production as the largest source of greenhouse gases and water pollution. Undercover investigations have documented farm animals being caged, crowded, mutilated, beaten and shocked.

Lent offers a superb opportunity to honor Christ's powerful message of compassion, but also to protect the health of our family and our planet Earth by adopting a meat-free diet.

Samson Natal

Frisco

Breckenridge's shortage of parking spaces for disabled skiers

This letter is to complain about the shortage of parking space for skiers with disabilities in Breckenridge. My wife and I are disabled skiers and have been visiting Breckenridge for years. We try to park our van at Peak 9, because of our need to be close to the slopes. My wife walks with a walker, and skis with a ski bike approved by Vail corporation. As a result of her disabilities, we need to park slopeside in order to have access to the slopes.

On Wednesday, the five handicap parking spaces at Peak 9 were full when we arrived. Because of this, I went to the nearest parking lot on the other side of the building. The parking lot attendant would not allow me to park without charge despite the fact that the 5 HC parking spaces at Peak 9 were full. It has been my experience that disabled skiers are permitted to park at Keystone and Vail parking lots that are easily accessible to the lifts when their HC spaces are full, without extra charge.

Apparently this is not so at Breckenridge. I contacted the Vail ski authorities who advised that they have no authority over the parking regulations and referred me to the parking division of the Breckenridge Police Department. The responding officer advised that the town had already been cited by ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) and currently meet the requirements of having the correct number of HC parking spaces for parking at Peak 9 at Breckenridge, and that I would have to take this issue up with the city council of Breckenridge. I basically was brushed aside.

I applaud the towns of Vail and Keystone for following the spirit of the ADA regulations and allowing disabled skiers to park at no charge at their lots no matter that the HC spaces are full. Why can't Breckenridge do the same? I used to also be able to park at Peak 8, but their disabled parking disappeared when they built the new condominiums at the base. Does no one at Breckenridge care about handicap access to the slopes? Why does the town of Breckenridge and/or Vail Associates not provide adequate HC parking slope side?

It's been a long fight for advocacy so that skiers with disabilities can enjoy the same quality of access as non-disabled skiers. I request that the town of Breckenridge follow the spirit of ADA and allow flexibility in arranging for disabled skiers to use other parking lots without charge when the HC spaces are full. I would like the community to be aware of this problem, so that it can be addressed and so that other disabled skiers are not put out as we were. I look forward to this issue being resolved before my wife and I return next winter.

Lawrence J Brick

Philadelphia, PA

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