Summit Daily letters: We need housing, but Dillon project isn’t the answer | SummitDaily.com

Summit Daily letters: We need housing, but Dillon project isn’t the answer

Opposition to the high-rise La Bonte condos

The 600 plus people who signed petition sheets at the Dillon Farmers Market last Friday, Aug. 10, oppose the two, 58-foot-tall condo buildings that Dillon Ridge Investments, LLC, proposes to build on both south corners of Main and La Bonte streets. Over 140 of these signatories were Dillon residents. Let's get a few things straight. These condos do include 12 "affordable units," if, by the term "affordable" one can find workforce folks who can afford a quarter of a million dollars for each. The opposition to the building of these two building isn't in any way a NIMBY (not-in-my-backyard) issue. Were every unit in these buildings "workforce" and the buildings were limited in height to but three or even four stories, most of us Dillon-ites would be thrilled. By the way, that the rest of the 36 units reputedly will be priced well into the four- and even five-hundred-thousand dollar range takes the whole workforce issue out of this conversation. The real and deeply troubling aspect to this decision that the Dillon Town Council will be considering on this Tuesday evening at 7 p.m., is whether to change the entire ambiance of the town. Dillon has always been recognized for its mountain and lake views. By sanctioning this proposed condo project, the council will be sacrificing that reputation for one of tall, out-of-place buildings. And for what? The population gain from these units is negligible. By all means, increase population density. By all means, build scores of workforce houses, apartments and condos. We desperately need them. By all means, commit to developing the town of Dillon into a progressive, compelling place to live, shop and dine. But (and this is the whole point) you don't have to sacrifice what so many have come to love about Dillon. You don't have to build high into the sky to satisfy these other compelling goals. We can have both if the town council will but vote to compromise on this project, thereby honoring its own stated objective of preserving the town's views as well as enabling the town to grow and prosper in responsible ways.

Rabbi Joel R. Schwartzman

Dillon

Ever-changing climate

In his Aug. 13 article "Good luck, poor choices," Jeffery Bergeron seemed quite distressed that there are those who disagree (they're engaging in "fallacy") with "the near unanimous opinions of [global warming] scientists."

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Real scientists must deal in facts, not opinions, and then be able to back up their conclusions with unadulterated data (not yet presented).

Perhaps "scientific" or "near unanimous opinions" are not always correct and should be open to further study. Indeed, about 50 years ago (not even a blink in earth terms), based on all the historic graphs and science, I was taught in excellent scientific higher education that Earth was heading into a mini global cooling period. Fifty years later, Earth doesn't all of a sudden make quick direction changes.

Climate change is not all bad. We live here in Colorado in places that were covered by glaciers long ago. I grew up in places in this country where magnificent lakes carved by glaciers and terminal moraines created by melted glaciers eons ago were a normal part of living for hundreds of years of family. I am grateful for the climate change that allowed such beauty and viable, livable land to be enjoyed by our ancestors, and now us, since the glaciers melted.

Since the climate always changes, perhaps glaciers will come again to our land long after we are history.

MC Hunt

Frisco

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