This week in history: Flu epidemic appears to wind down in Summit County | SummitDaily.com
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This week in history: Flu epidemic appears to wind down in Summit County

Compiled by the Breckenridge Heritage Alliance
"Two of the steel armored cars designed and built in California for the Mexican National railway lines for use in the regions that are infested with bandits."
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This week in history as reported by the Summit County Journal the week of February 14, 1920.

FLU EPIDEMIC NEARING END, SCHOOLS WILL OPEN DURING NEXT FEW DAYS

Mrs. Valeet Jobe was the only case of influenza reported Friday or Saturday All pneumonia patients are reported as improving. Carl Kaiser is reported as rapidly recovering. Today the opening of schools and theaters on or before February 23 was practically assured.

FAKE DETECTIVE NOW MAKING ROUNDS OF STATE’S MINING CAMPS

The second appearance of a self-styled detective from the Burns agency to make an appearance in Colorado mining towns was at Idaho Springs according to the Sifting-News of that town.

ANN’S LOVE MISSIVE WINS WIFE’S DIVORCE

“A letter signed ‘Ann’ full of endearing words and expressions, helped to win for Mrs. Pearl Simpson a divorce from Fred Simpson, a railroad man, in the county court,” says the Rocky Mountain News.

POPULATION OF SUMMIT AND BRECKENRIDGE WILL BE MADE KNOWN NEXT APRIL

Today Henry R. Rhone of Grand Junction said that results of the 1920 census would be distributed to the people of Summit county in April through the press.

GOLD BELT HAS NEW PRESIDENT

The Gold Belt Mining company, which is steadily developing its property on Brewery hill in the Farncomb hill district, has a new president in Charles Franklin of Iowa City, Ia. In Mr. Franklin is  a successful business man and building contractor who has constructed a number of buildings for the state institutions of Iowa.

An advertisement in the February 14, 1920 edition of the Summit County Journal from the Eclipse Theatre in Breckenridge, announcing that the venue would open shortly as the flu pandemic diminished in Summit County.
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