A&E Briefs: Travel Slide Show Series presents bears and eagles of Alaska | SummitDaily.com

A&E Briefs: Travel Slide Show Series presents bears and eagles of Alaska

On Friday, Feb. 5, the Friends of the Library’s 2016 Travel Slide Show Series continues with “Bears and Bald Eagles of Alaska,” with photographs by Richard Seeley and Matt Shetzer.
Matt Shetzer / Special to the Daily |

On Friday, Feb. 5, the Friends of the Library’s 2016 Travel Slide Show Series continues with “Bears and Bald Eagles of Alaska,” with photographs by Richard Seeley and Matt Shetzer. This is the second slide show presentation in the 2016 series.

“Alaska is known for having the largest population of grizzly bears and bald eagles in the United States,” Seeley, wildlife photographer of Silverthorne, said in a statement.

He and Shetzer, wildlife photographer, (also of Silverthorne) traveled extensively in Alaska in pursuit of exceptional wildlife images.

“We have taken wildlife pictures from Barrow, above the Arctic Circle to Ketchikan, the southeastern most city in Alaska, and many exciting places in between,” Seeley said.

Shetzer fell in love with the state, and now spends about two to three months a year there photographing.

“This year I spent the month of November specializing in eagle photography and videography,” he said in a statement.

Seeley has visited Alaska on six occasions from September 2009 to November 2015.

Seeley attended one of Shetzer’s photography workshops at Lake Clark National Park.

“I run photography workshops in Alaska photographing grizzly bears, bald eagles, puffins, snowy owls and northern lights,” said Shetzer. “This year after the workshop, I stayed four more weeks to photograph bald eagles,” he added.

Seeley favors “Lake Clark National Park with its high concentration of brown bears (grizzly) clamming with cubs on the Cook Inlet.”

“Brooks Falls in Katmai National Park also has brown bears catching salmon jumping the falls,” he said.

Both men agreed there isn’t a bad time to visit Alaska.

“Summertime is the typical time, and best time to see the bears. However, if you are an eagle fan, November is the time as there is a migration of 1,000 to 3,000 eagles that visit southeast Alaska,” said Shetzer.

Seeley said it depends on the type of wildlife species and nature events photographers want to see.

“July and September have grizzly bears fishing in the falls at Katmai National Park,” he said. “Brown bears are clamming in July and August and polar bears are out in Katovik in September.”

The Friends of the Library present these slide show presentations as part of their fundraising efforts to help the libraries purchase books and other supplies. You can follow the library on Facebook and Twitter or check the website at http://www.summitcountylibraries.org for more information.

New nonprofit seeks orchestra musicians

A new nonprofit is seeking orchestra musicians of all ages for major performances in September and December. The Rocky Mountain Foundation for the Performing Arts will provide community-oriented performances to promote education and music while benefiting local nonprofits. If interested, email willie@rockymountainfpa.org, or visit RockyMountainFPA.org.


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