Friends of the Library present ‘Winter Photography’ slideshow in Silverthorne | SummitDaily.com

Friends of the Library present ‘Winter Photography’ slideshow in Silverthorne

Daily News staff report
Photographer Dave Cooper will talk about the type of camera he uses, as well the lenses he chooses, at a travel slideshow presentation Friday, Jan. 31, at the North Branch Library in Silverthorne.
Dave Cooper / Special to the Daily |

If you go

What: “Winter Photography,” a travel slideshow featuring photography from Dave Cooper sponsored by Friends of the Library

When: 7 p.m. Friday, Jan. 31

Where: Blue River Room, North Branch Library, 651 Center Circle, Silverthorne

Cost: Free

More information: Call (970) 468-5887 for more information on the series or to participate in future slideshows

Photographer Dave Cooper will describe his techniques for taking beautiful winter photos during a travel slideshow presentation Friday, Jan. 31, at the North Branch Library in Silverthorne. Cooper grew up on the North Sea coast of England and was influenced by those winter scenes.

“One image in particular is still imprinted on my mind,” Cooper said. “That of a person combing the beach for coal on a cold, wintry day, sack slung over his/her shoulder. I remember rushing into the darkroom when I returned home to process the film. Over 40 years later, that image is still strong, even though the print was lost long ago.”

Through experiences such as that, and those gained later when he got into climbing, he’s explored the winter landscape.

“In fact, these days I find myself looking forward to winter as my favorite season for photography,” Cooper said. “Winter allows more latitude in when to shoot, mainly because the sun never rises high in the sky and I find that shooting directly into the sun can produce dramatic images.”

Cooper will talk about his camera and the lenses he uses. He is currently experimenting with a new camera system for climbing expeditions — the Olympus OM-D. Perhaps the most important task for a photographer is choosing the image. For Cooper, that means not only capturing the primary subject but also placing it in its environment.

“My goal is to allow the viewer of the image to feel as if they were there when the image was taken,” he said. “If I can’t visualize the final image, I don’t take the photograph.”


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