Hey, Spike! highlights locals visiting Broadway sights | SummitDaily.com

Hey, Spike! highlights locals visiting Broadway sights

Lake Dillon Theater Company fans see the Big Apple.
Karin Shook / Special to the Daily |

Nearly 50 Summit County avid theatergoers traveled to New York City recently for a quick, dramatic immersion in the Big Apple’s play offerings.

Led by Tim D. O’Donnell, director of education at the popular Lake Dillon Theater Company (LDTC), the group of locals took in Broadway’s sights and sounds Oct. 20-23, marking the seventh annual East Coast trip.

Also accompanying the group were LDTC artistic director Christopher Alleman and Josh Blanchard, the executive director.

“It went great,” said Tim. “It was a very large group this year, but everyone seemed to have a great time. We got to see a variety of different kinds of theater. With that, we actually saw four shows in three days.”

The travelers attended “Fun Home,” “Hamilton” and “Something Rotten,” which were scheduled, while a fourth of their choosing was possible.

Some went to see “Misery,” with Bruce Willis, and others took in personalized choices.

The group, most of who had been on previous trips, enjoyed a “talk back” session with the cast and crew of “Fun Home.”

LDTC’s Tim also arranged for the group meeting with a NYC panel of drama experts to discuss behind the scenes insights.

Locals met with Beth Blickers, an agent at the Agency for the Performing Arts, where she represents artists who work in theater, opera, television and film; Kimber Lee, whose plays include to the “Yellow House,” “Fight,” “Tokyo Fish Story,” and “Brownsville Song;” and Margaret Perry, an award-winning director of new plays.

Among the group was Bill’s Ranch resident Charlotte Clarke, who saw “Book of Mormon.”

“I chose Book of Mormon, which was my favorite,” Charlotte said. “What an absolutely irreverent hoot of a show.”

Charlotte said she became attracted to the show tour when “hosting” Friscoite Sharon Siler, who was recovering from a broken leg earlier this year.

Now fully recovered, the athletic Sharon made an encore trip this time. Charlotte plans to make a return trip next year.

“It was a fun, fun, fun trip,” says Sharon.

Here’s Charlotte’s take on the big city experience:

“New York — OMG what a place. I can only take that much cacophony in small doses. Everyone walks down the street shouting and gesticulating (they all have earbuds and are on their phones). It is a madhouse backed by car and truck and construction noise that would drive you mad quickly. Sharon and I braved the scary Metro to the Brooklyn Bridge and visited 9/11 site.

“At one point I had to escape to Central Park for a bike ride in peace. The rest of the time we were running from place to place, losing our directions and spinning like tops. Awful to have nothing but skyscrapers to navigate by.

“Times Square was nearby — such an unreal other world of neon, neon and neon; thought I was inside a weird netherworld of some sort.

“Anyway, it was a fabulous trip and plan to go again next year. Bottom line is — I love Broadway shows, but thank God, we can go back to our mountain paradise when it is all over.

“I was riding a bike in Central Park, so I missed the group photo.”

But it wasn’t straight back to Colorado for Charlotte, who immediately headed to the American Eagle, a paddle wheeler plying the Mississippi.

Another fan of Broadway theater making the trek was Linda Simon of Frisco, who was joined by Denver/Vail friend Karen Jo.

Linda describes the adventure as a “group trip without the usual perceived ‘group’ touring.”

“As a group we had two dinners, Victor’s Café and Southern Hospitality, the bus rides to and from Newark airport, a photo and panel discussion,” she reports. “And all of that was optional. Otherwise, we were on our own to explore. You could be at your own pace. Ours was jam-packed.”

The Linda-Karen team visited the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) — twice — for its Picasso sculptures and “Christina’s World” by Andrew Wyeth; the Neue Gallerie, home to Gustave Klimt’s portrait of “The Woman in Gold”; the 9/11 Memorial and One World Trade Center’s 101th floor observatory; Madison Square Park’s outdoor installation of canopies of mirrors above the walkways; taxi-ed to Whitney Museum; walked the whole High Line (rail-to-rail) elevated park; even enjoyed a leisurely breakfast with Karen’s friends; and walked in Central Park.”

Echoing Linda’s enthusiasm is Karen, who said, “Next year, we hope to do the horse and carriage ride around the entire Central Park. Our personal play choices, besides the outstanding ‘Hamilton,’ focused on seeing Al Pacino in ‘China Doll,’ ‘Misery,’ and Cicely Tyson and James Earl Jones in ‘The Gin Game.’ The weather was sensational and the company sublime.”

Others making the trip back east were Sharon Anderson, Harriett Bobo, Doug and Peggy Brown, Marilyn Fenner, John and Susan France, Lee and Peg Henry, Bill and Debbie Pain, Gretchen, Barbara and Nick Payne, Sherry and Wilson Strong, Kathy and Stege Swanson, Cheryl Tatro, Bill and Sandi Bruns, Judy and Russ Camp, Alan Ciamporceo, Don Dankner, John and Judy Goebel, Jerry and Jayne Karl, Susan Propper, Jo Ring, Shellie Rosser, Mark and Maxine Rossman, Carolyn Sachs, Steve and Trish Shapiro, and Milton Slepkow.

Miles F. Porter IV, nicknamed “Spike,” a Coloradan since 1949, is an Army veteran, former hardrock miner, graduate of Adams State College, and a local since 1982. An award-winning investigative reporter, he and wife Mary E. Staby owned newspapers here for 20 years. Email your social info to milesfporteriv@aol.com


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