This week in history August 7, 1920: Sawmill burns, census shows population loss | SummitDaily.com
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This week in history August 7, 1920: Sawmill burns, census shows population loss

Compiled by the Breckenridge Heritage Alliance
As reported in the August 7, 1920 edition of The Summit County Journal: the Japanese cruiser Kasuga anchored in Boston Harbor on a tour of the world. She is the first Japanese warship to visit Boston and her officers and crew were feted by the city. The cruiser will visit other American ports before sailing for home. The inset shows Baron J. Kamimura, commander of the Kasuga.
Photo from Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection

This week in history as reported by The Summit County Journal the week of August 7, 1920.

THE ROYAL TIGER SAWMILL BURNS

At about 10:30 Thursday evening, just as Fred J. Murphy, secretary of the company was driving into town on a return trip from Denver, he discovered a blaze near the sawmill. He hurried to give the alarm, and also to the fire, but had trouble in making the hose connection. Everything being dry near the mill, and with plenty of material to spread the fire, the flames soon got under good headway, and nothing that the crew could do, could prevent the whole plant from being destroyed.

TYMOS MINES COMPANY READY FOR OPERATION

The power line has been extended and all the machinery of the Tymos Mines Company on the deep shaft has been connected and is ready for operation. An additional shift of miners will be placed to work this evening and the crosscut to the Brooks-Synder property will be started at once.

CENSUS NUMBERS SHOW POPULATION LOSS COUNTY-WIDE

The figures of the 1920 census for Summit County have been announced and the county as a whole shows a loss of 279 people during the last 10 years. The total population of the county as shown by the census is 1,724.

The 1920 census data for Summit County is shown in this image from the August 7, 1920 edition of The Summit County Journal.
Image from Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection

Every town in the county shows a decrease. Though when Tiger, the tie camp and the Wellington boarding house are included, Breckenridge would have a population increase of 176. All of these places are directly attached to Breckenridge.

QUEEN CITY “TRAM”-LESS, COMPANY PROMISES RESUMPTION OF SERVICES IMMEDIATELY

Complete paralysis of the electric transportation facilities of Denver, followed a strike of more than 1,100 carmen at 5 a.m. Sunday, forcing thousands of persons in the city to walk. The strike went into effect immediately after the union men had voted 887 to 10 in favor of a walkout to enforce their demands for a wage of 75 cents an hour. They have been receiving 58 cents maximum.

U.M.W. REBUKED BY PRES. WILSON

President Wilson, through the United Mine Workers of America, has appealed to striking mine laborers in Illinois and Indiana to return to work.

INGENIOUS MOTION PICTURES

Motion pictures of construction work in which a large public building appears to rise from the ground like magic, being completed in the ten minutes’ duration of the film, are being shown before various engineering societies by government representatives, according to Popular Mechanics Magazine.

LOCAL NEWS NOTES FROM ALL AROUND SUMMIT COUNTY

Frank Strausser of the Tymos Mines Company spent the past couple of weeks here in the interest of his company. He leaves this morning for Chicago.

Haying has begun on the Blue River. In the Slate Creek district, the cutting of alfalfa has just commenced and in the lower part of the county the ranchers have begun to cut the timothy and clover hay crops, which will be one of the biggest in many years.

Several local fishermen visited Lost Lake last Sunday, but apparently the fish weren’t very much inclined to bite.

Lars Larson of Dillon, who has just finished a 10-day job of carpentry work at the Wahlstrom ranch, is now oiling the school furniture at the Slate Creek Schoolhouse in preparation for the upcoming school term.

Several community members attended the dance at Como Thursday night.

Those having items for the paper are urged to get their copy in by Thursday. As we do not believe in printing a paper the day after it is dated, please bear this in mind. We appreciate these little helps, but it takes some time to put these things in type and make up the paper, besides mailing it.


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