This week in Summit County history: Boys arrested for destroying flags | SummitDaily.com

This week in Summit County history: Boys arrested for destroying flags

Compiled by Breckenridge Heritage Alliance
This Week in History

The first car to drive over Loveland Pass. The inscription reads "1st car on Loveland Pass circa 1927." We know three of the four people photographed; O.W. Dogget, Ira Blondell, and Henry Ashlock. Loveland Pass is named after William A.H. Loveland, who was president of the Colorado Central Railroad during the late 19th century.

This week in history as reported by the Summit County Journal 100 years ago, the week of Sept. 26-30, 1916.

Two well-known Breckenridge boys were arrested the first of the week because of the belief on the part of the authorities and others that they were responsible for the destruction of flags and other decorations used by the Pioneer society at the recent picnic. The failure of any one to prosecute on definite charges, resulted in the lads being liberated shortly after their arrest, though not until they had been cautioned concerning their conduct and ordered to report to Judge Fall, juvenile officer, occasionally.

Boreas section foreman is seriously injured

Lugl DeLeo, Colorado and Southern section foreman at Boreas, was painfully injured Saturday last when he was thrown from a hand car which was descending a steep grade. In some manner, a board fastened to the front of the car for the purpose of holding tools on the car came loose and falling under the wheels, threw the car from the track. DeLeo was thrown several feet, striking on his head and suffering numerous deep cuts in the scalp. He was brought to town by the Bacon section crew and taken to the county hospital, where his injuries were attended by Dr. Graham.

Build pipe line and prepare for early spring placering

E.H. Crabtree and J.A. Spann, with whom others are associated, have devoted the past week to surveying and making preliminary arrangements for the construction of a pipe line from Indiana gulch, a distance of seven miles to the Washington and Pittsburg ground, on which they will conduct extensive placer operations next season.

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Found flaw in defense

When Police Captain Patrick Costello met a man on the main street of Dobbs Ferry loudly and joyfully disturbing the peace of the historic hamlet, he said: "My friend, you're drunk and I'll have to run you in."

The stranger drew a tattered Bible from his pocket and leading the captain to the nearest street lamp, read, with fervor: "First Timothy, five, twenty-three: 'Drink no longer water, but use a little wine for thy stomach's sake and thine often infirmities.'"

The captain scratched his head and thought. Finally he said: "What were you drinkin'?"

"Well," replied the stranger, "the last one was beer."

"Then," said the captain, "you lose on a technicality, and it's come with me."

Club should be satisfied

Twenty years ago an organization of women in New York began a fight to influence women to wear shorter skirts. The organization was known as the Rainy Day club, and branches of it were formed throughout the country. Mrs. A.M. Palmer, who has since its birth, just announced that the fight has been won with a vengeance, and that the organization may as well disband, unless it should decide to reverse its bylaws and begin a crusade for longer garments.

The Breckenridge Heritage Alliance is a nonprofit organization founded to promote and protect Breckenridge's unique heritage. The organization offers year-round guided tours and hikes. Go to breckheritage.com or call (970) 453-9767.