History in brief: Our favorite tidbits from Summit County’s colorful past | SummitDaily.com

History in brief: Our favorite tidbits from Summit County’s colorful past

Compiled by Breckenridge Heritage Alliance

Every week, the Summit Daily prints "This Week In History," with stories from the Summit County Journal that were published 100 years ago to date. This is done with the help of the Breckenridge Heritage Alliance, a nonprofit founded to promote and protect Breckenridge's unique history.

 

Wanted: A slogan for Colorado

The Colorado State Board of Immigration has, through the Colorado Editorial Association, offered a reward of $10.00 for the best state slogan. The contest is open to all. So, dear reader, think up a good slogan and send it to Aiva A. Swain, secretary of the State Editorial association, 419 E. & C. building, Denver. The judges are Governor Gunter, Lieutenant Governor Pullium, and Speaker of the House Best. The award will be made at the banquet tendered by the members of the general assembly by the editorial association in Denver, Monday, January 22.

  • week of Jan. 8–14, 1917

 

Whatley and Party Make Auto Trip to Climax

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Without quoting the language they used in describing the road over which they drove, it must be chronicled that attorney Whatley, mining engineer J.W. Steele and surveyors T.R. Griffith and J.D. Galloway returned from an automobile trip to Climax, via Ten Mile Canyon, on Thursday. The last three gentlemen are now firmly of the opinion that Mr. Whatley should be requisitioned by the British government to drive one of those “tanks” over the shell craters in France. They say he would make a record.

  • week of Sept. 30, 1917

 

Duck hunters raise alarm

The duck season has furnished Breckenridge a new sort of early morning alarm, inasmuch as the Goldpan pit is the scene of a volley of shotgun firing at daybreak every morning. Duck hunting has been unusually good this fall.

  • week of Sept. 30, 1917

 

Melrose nabs $26,000 worth of booze sent as books

Government agents working under the direction of James R. Melrose, acting chief special agent of the Department of Justice, discovered about 9,000 gallons of whiskey, designated as “books and stationery” in the freight stations at Denver of the Union Pacific and Burlington Railroads, valued at $26,000.

  • week of Sept. 30, 1917

 

'Picture ore' comes from the Minnie

Another shipper from Mineral hill this week was E.E. Miller & Co., who made a shipment of high grade lead-sulphide from their lease on the Minnie. This was the best grade of any taken to the sampler for a number of years. It was taken from some of the older workings on the Minnie property. One piece, said to have weighed about 300 pounds and to have been about 6 inches thick, was taken from one of the loads to be taken to Denver for exhibition. This piece of lead ore was a reminder of the early days in the mining history of Breckenridge when several leasers were taking out this grade of ore all the time from the rich surface pockets. During the past few years the rich surface strikes have been very few, the camp depending more on the increased output from the less rich ore at greater depths.

  • week of Oct. 13, 1917

 

The Breckenridge Heritage Alliance is a nonprofit founded to promote and protect Breckenridge’s unique heritage. The organization offers year-round guided tours and hikes. Go to BreckHeritage.com or call 970-453-9767.

 

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