How to Prepare Your Home for Spring | SummitDaily.com

How to Prepare Your Home for Spring

Sponsored by Breckenridge Building Center

In Summit County, the snow is beginning to melt, the days are getting longer and springtime is just around the corner. You successfully survived the winter, but how did your home fare? We sat down with Jenny Levasseur of Breckenridge Building Center to find out what we as homeowners should be doing to inspect our homes and prepare for the coming months.

Your springtime home checklist:

1. Equipment Storage

It's time to put away your snowblowers and shovels. Give them a light cleaning, inspect that they are in working order and properly store them for next winter. If repairs are needed, hire a professional.

2. Exterior Inspection

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Visually inspect the sides of your house, decks

and patios. On the lower portion of your house, check to see if snow and ice has caused any of the siding to pull away, or any nails to become loose. Depending on the level of damage, you can hire a professional or do it yourself. Check to see how the paint and stain is holding up, and repaint if needed. Keeping the paint and stain in good condition protects the wood and saves you money in the long run.

3. Interior Check-Up

Check your heating and plumbing systems, especially boilers and sump pumps. Hire a professional to perform a routine check-up. If there's a problem, it's best to address it early on, as it can cost more to fix later if the problem worsens.

4. Yard Clean-Up & Pothole Maintenance

Once you can see the ground around your property, rake the yard and clear away any fallen branches or limbs. Give your driveway a glance, and perform any needed pothole maintenance. If you address the holes now, this is a project you can tackle yourself. You can refill the holes with dirt, asphalt patch or concrete, purchased in small amounts. If you wait until the holes have expanded, you'll need to hire a professional.

5. Roof Repair

Check the roof for damage caused by snow buildup and ice dams. Snow buildup can turn into ice, causing damage to the roof and shingles and creating leaks as it expands. Ice dams are created when snow melts and moves down the roof, but doesn't fall or melt off, and forms a chunk of ice at the edge of the roof. These chunks of ice can become heavy and eventually fall off, pulling shingles and heat tape off with them. Hire a professional to repair any leaks or loose shingles to avoid flooding during the spring and summer rains.

6. Tree Health

Inspect each tree individually, evaluating the overall health. Is the tree leaning to one side? If so, you can help stabilize the tree with stakes and cables. Are there large dead branches or limbs with fewer leaves? Take time to properly prune and safely remove any dead branches, then watch for healthy regrowth. Inspect the base of the trunk, tree roots and ground around the tree. Cracked and raised soil can be a sign of a tree uprooting itself. Two other warning signs are sawdust — which can be caused by spruce and pine beetles — and fungal growth — which is a sign of a decaying tree. When major attention is needed, call an arborist.

7. Ice Removal

As we all know, we can still get late season snowstorms. Be sure to keep all walkways clear of snow so that it doesn't turn into ice. Use an ice melt that is pet- and environmentally-friendly. Clear snow and ice from the roof, as it can fall off in large sheets, causing a hazard to objects below.

Breckenridge Building Center | 13445 Hwy. 9, Breckenridge | (970) 453-2372 | http://www.breckenridgebuildingcenter.com