A&E briefs: Breckenridge Ski Resort announces Spring Fever lineup | SummitDaily.com
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A&E briefs: Breckenridge Ski Resort announces Spring Fever lineup

On Saturday, March 12, William David and Brian Hanly will present a one-hour violin-piano duo concert at Lord of the Mountains church in Dillon starting at 5 p.m., consisting of works by Handel, Wagner and Beethoven.
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Breckenridge Ski Resort announces Spring Fever lineup

Breckenridge Ski Resort announces the lineup for the Bud Light Free Concert Series as part of its annual Breck Spring Fever Festival, March 18 to April 17. The three concerts will include big-name, national acts Michael Franti & Spearhead, Lukas Nelson, and Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue.

Breck’s Spring Fever Festival, the largest spring skiing party in the Rocky Mountain region, kicks off the weekend of March 18, with the GoPro Big Mountain Challenge. In addition to the free concerts, the fun continues with a series of signature events including Easter family festivities, the Spring Fever Beer Festival and competitions in Breck’s Freeway and Park Lane terrain parks.

All concerts are free and will take place from 2-5 p.m. on a specially-constructed stage in Breckenridge Ski Resort’s Peak 8 base area, just outside One Ski Hill Place, a RockResort.

April 9: Michael Franti combines his love of R&B, hip-hop, reggae and poetry into a unique blend of music that inspires both the soul and mind. Franti is a charismatic performer and lead vocalist who connects seamlessly with his audience during his live performances. His recent album, “All People,” Franti exudes a sun-drenched and upbeat vibe, especially in his new song, “I’m Alive (Life Sounds Like)” which sets the scene for his other whistle-along hits.

April 16: The son of star crooner Willie Nelson first picked up a guitar at the age of 11 and practiced his craft by playing along to classic Stevie Ray Vaughn and Jimi Hendrix songs. Now, Lukas Nelson and Promise of the Real electrify fans year-round with performances across the country. Their cowboy, beach-hippy vibe meshes with a gritty rock ‘n’ roll feel that creates a high-energy and infectious live set. At the heart of Lukas Nelson and Promise of the Real is their undying passion of rock ‘n’ roll that speaks from the heart.

April 17: New Orleans native Trombone Shorty is the bandleader and frontman in the hard-edged funk band, Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue. He began playing professionally at the age of five, and now Trombone Shorty and his band tour internationally with their unique style that employs rock dynamics, a hip-hop beat and improvisation in a jazz tradition. The group’s musical talents are best showcased during live performance, where NOLA jazz heritage is paired with modern funk to delight fans everywhere.

Local artist presents work in Breckenridge

On Saturday, March 12, local artist Jessica Marie will present “Lines & Tines,” at Art Supply Breckenridge. The show emphasizes the overlooked beauty in Colorado; from discarded elk and moose antlers to native species of trout to the meticulously tied flies used to catch them. There’s something for everyone, from mountainous landscapes, delicate floral pieces and hummingbirds, to a few random jellyfish. The show will run throughout the entire month of March. Art Supply Breckenridge is at 201 S. Ridge St. For more information call (970) 423-6945.

Western History Book Club meeting

Western History Book Club meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 8, in the conference room of the Red, White & Blue Fire department in Breckenridge. Ray Smith will facilitate a discussion of national parks and monuments, now celebrating their centennial year.

The book group also looks forward to other spring programs: a discussion of ghosts and ghost towns in April and frontier medicine in May.

The book club is open to all residents of Summit County, part-time homeowners and visitors. Should anyone wish to attend any of the meetings or be added to the group’s mailing list, please contact the coordinator, Karen Musolf, at bdrmoose@msn.com.

Concert benefits church service program

On Saturday, March 12, William David and Brian Hanly will present a one-hour violin-piano duo concert at Lord of the Mountains church in Dillon starting at 5 p.m., consisting of works by Handel, Wagner and Beethoven. This will include a free-will offering to benefit the LOTM Day Services program. On Wednesday and Friday afternoons from 1–4 p.m., clients from the community have access at Lord of the Mountains church to showers, telephone, laundry, computer and internet. The Day Services program also provides vouchers for food or gas in emergencies along with information about food banks, the community dinner and other services offered in Summit County. Clients are referred by the Family and Intercultural Resources Center.

Brian Hanly is professor emeritus of violin and chamber orchestra at the University of Wyoming, and he has also taught previously at the Interlochen Arts Academy in Michigan and Peabody Preparatory in Baltimore.

After a distinguished 40-year career as founding member and pianist of the Ames Piano Quartet and faculty member at Iowa State University, William David recently retired and moved to Colorado. He continues to perform, teach and adjudicate.

Concert with violist Basil Vendryes with pianist James Howsmon

Summit Music and Arts artistic director Len Rhodes welcomes the community to an afternoon of exciting and diverse musical repertoire. SMA welcomes the return of violist Basil Vendryes with pianist James Howsmon performing contemporary and classical music. The program includes Sonata No. 2 for Viola da Gamba and piano, BWV 1028 by Bach; Sonata No. 1 in C minor (1924) by Röntgen; Phantasiestücke, Opus 117 by Fuchs; Magnificat (2012) by Pigovat; Elegie by Vieuxtemps; Liebestraume No. 3 (arranged by Lionel Tertis) by Liszt; Arlechino’s Waltz by Mullikin.

For tickets and season events visit summitmusicandarts.org or call (970) 389-5788.

—Compiled by

Heather Jarvis


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