America: nothing like it in the world | SummitDaily.com

America: nothing like it in the world

by Don Severe
Dillon

“Nothing like it in the world!” That statement most accurately describes the United States of America.

This summer we traveled through 23 states covering 12,000 miles, experiencing Americana in many ways. We met many diverse people as we visited museums, historical sites and unique communities. Oftentimes it was a walk down Main Street USA. There isn’t any other place in the world that offers such diversity in so many ways.

We have traveled in each of the 50 U.S. states over the years. However, this summer’s trek seemed more significant because of the condition in which we find the U.S. and the world today. Americans are very concerned about the future of our nation, as well they should be.

Within the 50 states, most U.S. citizens speak the same language and are governed by the most unique document affecting the lives of mankind, the U.S. Constitution. This is the cornerstone of true freedom and liberty. It creates an array of social, commercial and political opportunities, for the entire world to observe.

Where else in the world do people participate in so many different events in life? Where else can one drive over 3,000 miles or fly 7,000 miles and meet people who share, essentially, the same fundamental values and national heritage. Yet, in that same distance one can experience very different regional cultures as well, from the Louisiana Cajuns to the Alaska Inuits; the Southwestern Hispanic culture to the Northeast fishing villages. Our speech accents may be different but our love of this nation is the same.

This is, truly, the melting pot of the world with people of all races, skin colors, ancestral origins, many languages and most religions. And, we are free to live our lives as we choose within the bounds of the laws. Foreign guests from other, far more restrictive nations can move about freely in the U.S. unimpeded as though they are citizens.

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We can freely express our views in so many ways. Most are not sacrosanct. We can voice our political opinions as well as criticize our politicians and bureaucrats. This can be done in the various media, rallies, assemblies, town hall meetings and highway billboards to mention a few.

From Jamestown to Plymouth Rock there are symbols everywhere reminding us of the hardy people who first came to build new lives. From the Liberty Bell to Mt. Vernon and Monticello we pay tribute to those men who initiated the Declaration of Independence from England and who were signers of the U.S. Constitution.

We visited battlefield sites, including The Alamo; Vicksburg; Shiloh; Appomattox; the WWII Museums in Fredericksburg, Texas and New Orleans; the USAF Museum in Dayton, Ohio, the Lincoln Library in Springfield, Illinois, the military posts on the Western frontier and the various memorials in our nation’s capital, and were reminded of the sacrifices made by our ancestors in preserving our freedoms.

The theme of the weeklong world’s largest Air Show in Oshkosh, Wisconsin was a Salute to Veterans. The feeling of American pride was beaming everywhere among the hundreds of thousands of attendees at this great event.

There have been so many great patriots go before us to fight the battles who have preserved our peace and freedom. Some are your neighbors here in Summit County.

Visiting with museum docents and citizens on the streets and reading the political billboards were reminders that Americans savor their freedoms and do not wish to surrender to anyone who would abrogate any articles of the Constitution. Clearly, the majority of Americans feel a patriotic duty to their nation, families and fellow citizens. Without exception we observed a continuous and steady demonstration of people’s love for our country, in both subtle and powerful ways.

Strangers would talk to us about the immigration bill SB 1070 in Arizona and other states adopting the same legislation. Many wished to show support for those governors and legislators willing to support the rule of law under the Constitution. We were overwhelmed with pride when Americans of all colors and ancestry approached us, unsolicited, and offered their opinions of what has made our nation great.

Truly, there’s nothing like it in the world … a nation offering such great freedoms to do what we want, when we want and where we want … within the rights afforded under the U.S. Constitution. Why else are people flocking to our borders, from around the world, wanting to be a part of the United States of America?

Don Severe, Dillon