Ann Weaver documents Breck’s history, present through watercolor | SummitDaily.com
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Ann Weaver documents Breck’s history, present through watercolor

LESLIE BREFELDSummit Daily News
Summit Daily illustration/Kristine Crawford
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Summit County, CO ColoradoBRECKENRIDGE – Working off her current database of photography and some that were over 100 years old, former Summit County artist Ann Weaver brings a new perspective to Breckenridge’s history. “A Moment in Time: Paintings of Breckenridge Past & Present” features 35 new watercolor works with a focus on Breck architecture. The Barney Ford House Museum exhibit will remain up through July of next year and marks a new phase for the historical building.Museum director Beth Carlson said the informational exhibits in the Barney Ford House had been the same since its opening two years ago. Beginning with the Weaver show, however, the museum will host two new exhibits a year in hopes of attracting more visitors to the site at the corner of Washington Avenue and Main Street in Breck.”We really just want to get new people in the museum – especially locals” Carlson said. The exhibits will support the museum’s mission to promote interest and education in Breckenridge history and black American history. Carlson is already looking ahead to what they hope to bring to the museum next year.”The Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame has a great collection of African American women … I would like to get their stories and photographs in the museum,” she said.Weaver, who premieres a new show annually at the Buffalo Mountain Gallery in Frisco (and also has her work available at its sister business Hang Time in Breckenridge), had already painted the Barney Ford House Museum and the Edwin Carter Museum a few times when she took on the project.The New Jersey lawyer turned Colorado watercolorist came into her own as an artist during her time in Summit County from 1990-1999. While here she owned her own gallery in Breckenridge, called The Snow Goose, and was a member of the Summit Historical Society.The artwork in her latest exhibit includes scenes of Breckenridge such as Main Street in 1860 with the Silverthorn Hotel, which was named after a judge at the time; the County Courthouse, which Weaver will tell you had the town’s first public ladies restroom; a present-day scene of the Horseshoe II Restaurant; a piece called, “Mrs. Ford’s Lilacs,” which runs with the idea that pioneer families brought travel-friendly lilacs with them to their new homes; and even one showing how it could have looked before any human interaction.”I’ve always painted Breckenridge and I’ve always emphasized the history,” Weaver said. “But I’ve never painted buildings that are no longer here before … The town is such a wealth of history.”

Museum director Beth Carlson said the informational exhibits in the Barney Ford House had been the same since its opening two years ago. Beginning with the Weaver show, however, the museum will host two new exhibits a year in hopes of attracting more visitors to the site at the corner of Washington Avenue and Main Street in Breck.”We really just want to get new people in the museum – especially locals” Carlson said. The exhibits will support the museum’s mission to promote interest and education in Breckenridge history and black American history. Carlson is already looking ahead to what they hope to bring to the museum next year.”The Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame has a great collection of African American women … I would like to get their stories and photographs in the museum,” she said.

Weaver, who premieres a new show annually at the Buffalo Mountain Gallery in Frisco (and also has her work available at its sister business Hang Time in Breckenridge), had already painted the Barney Ford House Museum and the Edwin Carter Museum a few times when she took on the project.The New Jersey lawyer turned Colorado watercolorist came into her own as an artist during her time in Summit County from 1990-1999. While here she owned her own gallery in Breckenridge, called The Snow Goose, and was a member of the Summit Historical Society.The artwork in her latest exhibit includes scenes of Breckenridge such as Main Street in 1860 with the Silverthorn Hotel, which was named after a judge at the time; the County Courthouse, which Weaver will tell you had the town’s first public ladies restroom; a present-day scene of the Horseshoe II Restaurant; a piece called, “Mrs. Ford’s Lilacs,” which runs with the idea that pioneer families brought travel-friendly lilacs with them to their new homes; and even one showing how it could have looked before any human interaction.”I’ve always painted Breckenridge and I’ve always emphasized the history,” Weaver said. “But I’ve never painted buildings that are no longer here before … The town is such a wealth of history.”

Working off of historical, black and white photos, Weaver imagined how some parts of each scene would have looked.”I can play around them because know one knows,” she said. “It’s like the dinosaurs.” Weaver said she often isolates the building she is focusing on in the painting by taking out other buildings. She also embellishes the scene with wildflowers and colors.Her favorite: “I love snow scenes – making trees loaded with snow.” Weaver now lives in Denver, yet continues to teach in Summit County her annual watercolor workshop at Colorado Mountain College.

The Barney Ford House Museum is open Tuesday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m.Twenty percent of the price of Weaver’s artwork from this exhibit will be donated to the museum.


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