Avalanche report for Monday 1/24 | SummitDaily.com
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Avalanche report for Monday 1/24

Courtesy of the CAIC

This is Knox in the Colorado Avalanche Information Center with current information on mountain weather, snow, and avalanche conditions at 6:15 am, Monday, January 24, 2005.

High pressure remains firmly fixed over Colorado and all the Rocky

Mountains, so another sunny, dry, mild day today. On Tuesday again mostly clear and dry, but winds will shift to the northwest and bring a slight cooling trend. Then by Wednesday a trough along the West Coast will bring high to mid-level clouds into Colorado, but the only chance for snow would be isolated snowshowers in the San Juans.

The forecast details:

Monday: Clear. Winds WSW/0-10. Highs 30-40. Lows tonight 15-25.

Tuesday: Mostly clear. Winds NW/5-10. Highs 25-35. Lows 13-23.

Wednesday: Partly cloudy. Light winds. Highs 25-35.

Monday: Clear. Winds WSW/0-10. Highs 30-40. Lows tonight 15-25.

Tuesday: Mostly clear. Winds NW/5-10. Highs 25-35. Lows 13-23.

Wednesday: Partly cloudy. Light winds. Highs 25-35.

Monday: Clear. Winds WSW/0-10. Highs 30-40. Lows tonight 15-25.

Tuesday: Mostly clear. Winds NW/5-10. Highs 25-35. Lows 13-23.

Wednesday: Mostly cloudy. Light winds. Highs 25-35.

Daytime temperatures have been warm since Friday, and this has brought settlement, densifying, and strength to most of the mountain snowpack. The sunny aspects have developed surface crusts from the freeze-thaw cycles the last three days. This is the case on most SE through W aspects. Wet-loose releases have been common there, and more are expected today, but slab releases are not occurring.

On NW through E aspects, especially at the higher elevations near and above TL, the snowpack is maintaining its cold temperatures, and strengthening has been a little slower. These are the slopes where snow quality for skiing and snowboarding has stayed good to fair, so these slopes will attract the BC users. But this is also where deep instabilities still lurk. There has been very little activity reported recently . only one fresh deep slab spotted on Sunday in the northern part of the Steamboat zone. Slab avalanches will be hard to release, but fractures could propagate because of the persisting deep slab. Backcountry travelers should dig pits to look for and test weak

layers and should always travel avalanche areas one at a time.

Dig several hasty pits, as instability will likely vary greatly over area.

For all mountain areas, the backcountry avalanche danger is trending lower because of the stabilizing effect of the weather. On NW through E aspects near and above TL, we rate the danger MODERATE, though there may still be pockets of CONSIDERABLE on slopes steeper than 35 degrees. Human-triggered slab releases remain possible.

On SE through W aspects, the danger is generally LOW, but with one important exception: above TL there are still areas of hard slab that should be treated with caution. Hard slab releases could be triggered in the areas where the slab gets thinner, and once triggered the fracture could propagate into the deep area of the slab.

Williams


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