AYP 101 | SummitDaily.com
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AYP 101

Special to the DailyAYP calculation and formula
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FRISCO – If you’re confused about how AYP results are calculated, you’re not the only one. Just looking at AYP websites, one is confronted with a wealth of percentages and algebraic equations that look more appropriate to a chemistry lab. To paraphrase an old saw, you may indeed have to be a brain surgeon to figure some of this stuff out.

Here are a few AYP basics to remember:- AYP results are based on statistics, and those statistics are based on demographics. – English language learners, economically disadvantaged children and special education children are all separate demographic categories. Ethnic categories are separated as well, such as Hispanic, African American, Asian and Caucasian.

– A target is based on a group of 30 or more students within a demographic. Fewer than 30 students do not comprise a calculable demographic in the AYP system. The more demographic categories consisting of 30 or more students a school has, the more targets a school has.This means that school districts with larger numbers of students will have more targets to make because of the increase of demographic categories. Districts with a smaller number will have fewer targets to make. Because of this, smaller school districts have a better chance of meeting AYP.- Another factor is that the target is a moving one. Every three years the performance targets increase.



– The number of targets differs from district to district, school to school and year to year because of school population and demographic changes. – Statistically, if one school within the district does not make AYP, then the entire school district will not make AYP.- In order to make AYP, students must: 1) meet the 95 percent participation requirement, 2) meet the math and reading performance targets (or decrease the percent of students scoring nonproficient by 10 percent from the prior year, and 3) achieve 1.10 percent of students scoring at the advanced level on reading and math at both elementary and middle school levels. At the high school level, the school must meet the graduation rate target.


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