Blue River in Silverthorne closed due to high water | SummitDaily.com
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Blue River in Silverthorne closed due to high water

The Blue River flows under the 6th Street bridge in Silverthorne on Monday, June 1. The Summit County Sheriff’s Office and town of Silverthorne have temporarily closed the Blue River from the base of the Dillon Dam to the Sixth Street Bridge in Silverthorne due to high water.
Jason Connolly / jconnolly@summitdaily.com
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The Summit County Sheriff’s Office and town of Silverthorne have temporarily closed the Blue River from the base of the Dillon Dam to the Sixth Street Bridge in Silverthorne, according to a press release. The closure is due to high water caused by snow runoff being released from the dam.

Denver Water notified the town and Sheriff’s Office that water in the Upper Blue north of the Dillon Dam had reached 1,000 cubic feet per second on Monday, June 1. Sheriff Jaime FitzSimons and Silverthorne Police Chief John Minor agreed there was a risk of serious injury or even death presented by the high water.

The closure will remain in place until water levels are low enough that recreational boaters can safely pass under the Sixth Street Bridge.

The Sheriff’s Office also reminded residents to take precautions when venturing near the river in the coming weeks as the spring runoff peaks. As of June 1, the Blue River was running at 1,000 cfs below Dillon Reservoir. Other flows into Lake Dillon include the Blue River flowing from Breckenridge at 420 cfs, Tenmile Creek flowing at 643 cfs below its confluence with North Tenmile Creek and Straight Creek flowing at 71 cfs.

Guidelines for safety around high water

The Sheriff’s Office said it strongly discourages people from any recreational activities in the water without proper training, experience and equipment. The agency recommends the following guidelines to stay safe around high water:

  • If flooding occurs, get to higher ground immediately.
  • Stay away from flood-prone areas, including dips, low spots, valleys, ditches, washes, etc.
  • Avoid flooded areas and those with fast-moving water.
  • Do not attempt to cross a flowing stream. Six inches of moving water is all it takes to sweep a person off his or her feet.
  • Don’t allow children or pets to play near high water, storm drains, culverts or ditches.
  • Flooded roads could have significant damage hidden by floodwaters. Never drive through floodwaters or on flooded roads. If your vehicle stalls, leave it immediately and seek higher ground. It only takes 2 feet of water to wash away most automobiles.
  • Do not camp or park your vehicle along streams and washes, particularly when water levels are high or fluctuating.
  • When recreating in or around the water, use the proper size and type of personal floatation device.
  • Anglers should wear wading belts to prevent water from entering waders during a fall.
  • Be especially cautious at night, when it is harder to recognize flood dangers.
  • Monitor NOAA Weather Radio or your local media for vital weather-related information.
  • Local and state officials are constantly monitoring flows in waterways throughout Summit County and are prepared to respond to any flooding.

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