Breckenridge Film Festival offers interactive teen, children programs | SummitDaily.com

Breckenridge Film Festival offers interactive teen, children programs

"Tiny Town" will screen on Saturday, Sept. 19 as part of the Free Community Children's Program at 11 a.m. at the Riverwalk Center.
Courtesy Breckenridge Film Festival |

if you go

Teen Programming

When: Storyboarding for Teens Forum, Friday, Sept. 18 at noon; Teen Filmmaking Workshop, Sunday, Sept. 20 at noon

Where: Hopefull/Discovery Rooms at the Breckenridge Grand Vacations Community Center and South Branch Library

Cost: Free

Free Community Children’s Program

When: Saturday, Sept. 19, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Where: Riverwalk Center

Cost: Free

An interactive motion capture studio will be set up at the Riverwalk Center, available between films, and Old Masonic Hall during box office hours.

This year, the Breckenridge Film Festival partnered with the Summit County South Branch Library and CU Denver Digital Animation Center to offer more children’s and teen’s programming than ever before.

For teens, Monica Owens ­— library aid with community outreach adult and teen services with the library — worked with filmmakers to create two events during the festival. The first, Storyboarding for Teens Forum, will be held Friday, Sept. 18 at noon in the Hopefull/Discovery Rooms in the Breckenridge Grand Vacations Community Center and South Branch Library.

“We decided since it was the beginning of the school year, and some of the kids might be taking classes at school about filmmaking, a good start to the filmmaking process is storyboarding, planning,” Owen said. “We put a call out to filmmakers (who) would be interested in presenting to teens and got some enthusiastic replies.”

Grades six through 12 will learn the fundamentals of storyboarding and story art form from Christian Gosset and John Ludwick, two filmmakers who will be in town for the festival. Gosset’s designs have appeared in the Star Wars films, Sir Peter Jackson’s “King Kong” and Tim Burton’s “Alice in Wonderland.” John Ludwick, a storyboard artist since 1999, is a self-proclaimed “Storyboarding Evangelist” and is attending the festival to represent his film “Claire & the Keys.”

The second workshop, Ready… Set … Stop! Teen Filmmaking Workshop, will be a hands-on workshop using stop-motion animation on Sunday, Sept. 20 at noon. Students will first look at example films and, using the library’s iPads, will then learn techniques and create their own short films. The final product will be shared at the Breckenridge Film Festival, as well as the library’s website and social media platforms.

Owens hopes the workshop will encourage students to come back to the library to utilize the tools available for other projects. The library always offers an iMac with video editing software such as Final Cut Pro and Pro X and iMovie that students can come in and use whenever the library is open. The library also carries video cameras, green screens and iPads.

“I hope that (the students) will walk away with an appreciation for the filmmaking process and an excitement on using their imagination and creativity in making their own films,” she said. “Video is such an important part of our lives these days, and everyone can be a filmmaker with all the different technologies we have. “

CHILDREN’S PROGRAM

Students with the CU Denver Digital Animation Society will be on-hand teaching children about filmmaking during the Free Community Children’s Program at 11 a.m., Saturday, Sept. 19 at the Riverwalk Center. First up, children will watch screenings of “Tiny Town,” a CU Denver Digital Animation Center production, “Switchman” and “Pop Star Puppy,” which all received top-notch reviews from the festival’s youth selection committee.

Following the films from 1:15–2 p.m., children will have a chance to become filmmakers. Students with CU Denver Digital Animation Center have created puppets from the shorts that will be shown, and kids will be able to step behind the camera and make their own film, said Sara Louviere, a senior at CU Denver who has been organizing the activities for the program. There will also be activity sheets for children who are too young to participate but still want to have fun, she said.

Going on throughout the weekend at the Riverwalk Center and the Old Masonic Hall will be an interactive motion capture studio also run by students from CU Denver Digital Animation Society. Children, as well as adults, can step into a modular motion capture suit and step into the scene, Louviere said.

“They can see themselves as characters in the digital relm,” she said.

The CU students are also using the presentation to help create their short film, “Too Much Glue.”

“One of the motion-capture games we are planning is to have the kids help us out with is acting out some of the scenes from the short we are making this year,” Louviere said. “So the kids will have an opportunity to have their own little handprint in our short for next year.”

The motion capture studio will be available between films at the Riverwalk Center and at the Old Masonic Hall during box office hours.

“I’m really hoping (the kids) can go home understanding that creating films is not extremely hard, anyone can do it, all you need really is a camera,” Louviere said. “That is one of the ideas I’m pushing behind the children’s puppet show, we are just going to have a camera and a tripod and a computer set up. So everyone can see how we cut the clips together to make a film. … I’m hoping that we can inspire kids to go home and make their own movies.”


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