Breckenridge Grand Vacations named best large company in Denver Post’s 2018 Top Workplaces list | SummitDaily.com

Breckenridge Grand Vacations named best large company in Denver Post’s 2018 Top Workplaces list

The Denver Post has ranked Breckenridge Grand Vacations the best large company in the newspaper's list of 2018 Top Workplaces, marking the first time a Summit County business has secured the top spot in the annual statewide survey, according to a Tuesday news release.

The rankings are based on employee feedback surveys that sought to gauge several aspects of workplace culture and employee satisfaction. Last year BGV landed at No. 24 for the best mid-sized workplaces in Colorado.

This year, more than 48,000 workers at hundreds of companies across the state took the survey, and the results were compiled by an independent third-party. For the rankings, the companies were grouped into one of three categories with the largest grouping reserved for Colorado businesses that employ 500 people or more.

Being named No. 1 in the large business category means that BGV beat out well-known nominees such as Edward Jones, USAA, Pinnacol Assurance, Progressive Insurance, T-Mobile and many others.

"BGV has always strived to be the best place to work in Summit County," said company CEO Mike Dudick. "We feel so fortunate to be recognized as the top workplace in the state, and it gives us a tremendous feeling of accomplishment that we're providing a rewarding work environment."

At the end of the day, he continued, the honor really goes to all the BGV employees who "provide unbelievable vacation experiences to (BGV's) guests," and he couldn't be more proud of the BGV team.

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BGV has been a locally owned and operated company since 1984, managing four timeshare properties in Breckenridge, including Gold Point Resort, Grand Timber Lodge, the Grand Lodge on Peak 7 and the Grand Colorado on Peak 8.

With 600-plus employees, BGV stands as the largest year-round employer in Breckenridge and second largest overall. Even more impressive is that over 20 percent of BGV's workers have been with the company for longer than five years, according to the company.

That kind of longevity, especially in a resort town known for short-timers, begs the question: What makes BGV such a great place work?

For Joanni Linton, general manager of the Grand Lodge, it might be upward mobility. She has been with BGV for over 7 years after starting off in an entry-level position behind the front desk. Since then, multiple promotions have landed her the general manager's role, which she accepted in March 2016.

"The company invests in its employees," Linton said matter-of-factly, adding that her climb is not unique, but a common scenario at BGV.

Working in housekeeping, Noemí Salgado has been with BGV for about nine months now. During that time, she has come to believe her bosses "truly care about every one of their employees," she said.

As examples, Salgado highlighted the company's generous benefits package, which includes options to participate in health and 401k retirement plans for anyone who works 20 hours or more a week, in addition to the company's continued efforts to provide her "a fun working environment."

"I can't say enough good things about this company," said Salgado, who's come to think of her coworkers as extended family.

Issakha N'Diaye also works in housekeeping. He has been with BGV since July but lived in Summit County for the last 13 years. Since moving here, N'Diaye said, he has held jobs with seven different companies, but none has been better a better place to work than where he is now.

BGV's senior owner support specialist Griffin Kay echoed many of his co-worker's statements, saying he's heard plenty of corporate spiels at his pervious places of employment about the companies' commitment to their employees. However, at BGV, it's more than just "feel-good, fluffy company culture talk. It's truly how this business is run."

Boiling down how the BVG treats its employees to a single word, culture and career development manager Rob Dollars said he thinks the right one has to be "supportive."

"We try very hard to make sure our mangers understand their job is to support their employees," he explained, adding that cross-department promotions are common and that, in turn, helps recruit, train and retain good workers for the long term.

All of it flows into BGV's efforts to give employees the freedom they need to make good decisions and grow within the company, said Ginny Vietti, vice president of marketing, who believes autonomy is one of the company's strongest selling points for its employees.

"You don't have to get permission from a manager to create a great vacation," she said of the company's mantra. "You just do it."

BGV also has an employee-assistance fund, in which workers voluntarily pay into the fund with the money reserved for any of their peers who might be facing unforeseen crises. The monetary awards are determined by a committee of workers, not managers, and the program can best be described as "peers helping peers," said Vietti, who noted that BGV's workers have contributed more than $46,000 to the fund.

Additionally, BGV offers a tuition-assistance program for higher education, in addition to its leadership programs and another one that encourages employees to volunteer for good causes of their choosing by offering each worker up to three full days of paid time off so he or she can devote time to the community without having to miss work or do it on a day off.

According to Vietti, 106 BGV employees took advantage of BGV's volunteer program last year.