Colorado man sent to New Mexico in explosives, detonators theft case | SummitDaily.com

Colorado man sent to New Mexico in explosives, detonators theft case

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DENVER – A federal magistrate ruled Friday that a man accused of stealing hundreds of pounds of explosives and detonators from a site near Albuquerque, N.M., will be returned to New Mexico to face charges.Leslie Brown, 44, his brother, David Brown, 49, and Eric Armstrong, 32, are accused of breaking into locked containers on an engineering company’s storage site.Leslie Brown, who has lived near the southwestern Colorado town of Ignacio all his life, cannot be released from custody unless a federal judge in New Mexico allows it and he has a place to live, U.S. Magistrate Judge Boyd Boland said during a brief hearing.Brown’s preliminary hearing will be in New Mexico.Brown was living on property owned by his mother and she is not willing to allow him to return, defense attorney Edward Harris said. Harris asked the judge to allow his client to be released on bond when he can find housing, saying there was nothing to suggest he would be a danger to the community or fail to appear in court.Prosecutor David Allison argued against release.”The fact the defendant’s own mother will not give him a place to stay speaks very loudly in this courtroom,” he said.Man settles lawsuit with city over NATO protest arrestCOLORADO SPRINGS – A man who was arrested outside a 2003 NATO conference at a local hotel has agreed to drop his federal lawsuit against the city for $5,000.Brian Hildenbrandt was arrested and charged with trespassing, a charge that was dropped because of a lack of evidence. Hildenbrandt said his arrest violated his First Amendment rights, that he never crossed the barricades outside The Broadmoor hotel and he was in the area only to see what was going on.Hildenbrandt said Thursday he had to settle after a judge ruled he could not talk to jurors about the arrest, trespassing charge or its subsequent dismissal.Popular CU journalism teacher diesBOULDER – Malcolm A. “Mal” Deans, who was a reporter and editor at newspapers around the country before becoming a popular journalism teacher at the University of Colorado, died Thursday of pancreatic cancer. He was 83.Students consistently rated Deans, who preferred to remain an instructor at CU rather than be named professor, among the best teachers at the School of Journalism, said Dean Paul Voakes. He said Deans’ work while he was at the school from 1976-1987 included creating the Campus Press student newspaper and developing an internship program in which senior students work at area newspapers. The program still exists.Aspen Skiing agrees to scale back summer plans at SnowmassASPEN – The Aspen Skiing Co. said it will trim its plans for summer activities in Snowmass in hopes of protecting elk.The company has approval to build a new gondola at the bottom of the Snowmass resort to the bottom of the Elk Camp chairlift. The gondola and a new restaurant are expected to bring more visitors to that part of the mountain during the summer offseason.- The Associated PressState wildlife officials and local environmental groups said they worried the development would affect elk habitat. The company had planned to build four trails for hikers and bikers, but now will build only one, away from the Burnt Mountain area in question.”Very friendly and reasonable discussions led to this,” said Sloan Shoemaker, executive director of the Wilderness Workshop. “Skico, much to their credit, realized the depth of the opposition to this project as it was proposed, and adjusted accordingly.”The company has also agreed to herd hikers and bikers away from Burnt Mountain by closing terrain at the top of Elk Camp chairlift in the summer and chairlifts during the summer won’t run until after June 20, when elk calving season is over. Leashes will be required for dogs.