Colorado News Roundup: Funeral ceremony held for forgotten veterans (06.26.16) | SummitDaily.com

Colorado News Roundup: Funeral ceremony held for forgotten veterans (06.26.16)

Here's what's going on around Colorado today:

VETERANS

FORGOTTEN VETERANS WHO DIED FINALLY GET FUNERAL CEREMONY

DENVER — Fort Logan National Cemetery held a ceremony Saturday to honor 30 veterans whose remains have gone unclaimed.

The Unclaimed Veterans Remains Ceremony held Saturday is part of the nationwide Missing In America Project.

Cemetery staff assistant O'Neal Hughes says the veterans' cremated remains were left at funeral homes, sometimes for decades, or others who had no next of kin.

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During the ceremony, the names were read aloud, including their rank, branch and war in which they served. A bell was rung to honor each veteran.

Another 36 veterans will be honored at another service in about two months.

TRAGEDY

MAN DEAD AFTER APPARENTLY BEING HIT BY A TRAIN

FORT COLLINS, Colo. — One person is dead after he was apparently hit by a train while sitting on the tracks in Fort Collins.

Fort Collins police say the accident occurred early Sunday.

Police say a BNSF train was northbound on the railroad tracks when the engineer saw several people sitting close to the tracks. The engineer slowed the train and sounded the horn, but one person was slow and apparently got hit.

Authorities checked the tracks and found a body.

Police say the collision occurred in an area with no traffic or pedestrian crossings.

EDUCATION

COMPLAINTS PILE UP OVER UNIVERSITY SPEECH REGULATIONS

GREELEY, Colo. — Complaints are continuing to pile up after the University of Northern Colorado created a Bias Response Team to deal with behavior deemed to be offensive, including issues involving race, religion, national origin and sexual orientation.

Complaints range from in-class assignments to students' strongly stated political opinions. They even included cooking competitions that caused problems for students with eating disorders.

First Amendment supporters say they have concerns about investigations, and they say the regulations could have a chilling effect on education.

According to more than 240 documents reviewed by the Greeley Tribune that were obtained through an online publication, Bias Response Team members sought to censor what a professor can cover in class, and the team has advised another professor not to discuss some sensitive issues at all to avoid offending students.

UNC officials said they just want to educate students about offensive rhetoric.

— The Associated Press