Colorado News Roundup: Pot legalization hasn’t led to higher youth use (06.20.16) | SummitDaily.com

Colorado News Roundup: Pot legalization hasn’t led to higher youth use (06.20.16)

Here’s what’s going on around Colorado today:

MARIJUANA

YOUTH POT USE HASN'T GONE UP SINCE LEGALIZATION

DENVER — Marijuana use among Colorado high schoolers has not increased since legalization. That's according to the state Health Department, which released a new batch of youth survey results Monday.

The 2015 survey of about 17,000 middle and high school students across the state showed that about 21 percent of high school students reported that they currently use pot.

That's just a hair below the national average, which was almost 22 percent.

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Nine of 10 Colorado high school youth said they don't smoke cigarettes. That's the highest rejection of smoking by high school youth in the past decade.

For the first time, the survey took note of the health behaviors of high school students who identified as transgender. Those students reported higher rates of tobacco use, drug use and bullying.

PUBLIC SAFETY

COLORADO BOY IMPROVING AFTER MOUNTAIN LION ATTACK, SAYS FAMILY

DENVER — The family of a Colorado boy attacked by a mountain lion near Aspen says its 5-year-old is doing better in a Denver hospital after his mother snatched him from the jaws of the wild cat.

In a brief statement released on its behalf by Children's Hospital Colorado, the unnamed family also thanked the public for its concern and requested privacy.

A Pitkin County sheriff's officer has called the mother a hero for charging the animal during Friday's attack, yanking away one of its paws and prying open its jaws.

The boy was flown to Denver with deep but not life-threatening cuts to his head, face and neck. His mother had scratches and bites.

Wildlife officials killed two mountain lions in the area after the attack.

Mountain lions rarely attack humans.

EDUCATION

DENVER SCHOOL DISTRICT ASKS NEARLY $4 MILLION FOR NEW LOCKS

DENVER — Colorado's largest school district is asking for nearly $4 million for a mechanical fix that will streamline the lockdown procedure in an emergency.

The Denver Post reports that the item in an upcoming Denver Public Schools bond request comes at a time when districts across Colorado need millions to comply with an updated fire code requirement that public, charter and junior colleges have locks for designated classrooms that can be operated from inside.

Jefferson County estimates it needs nearly $5 million to replace classroom locks. In western Colorado, The Daily Sentinel reports District 51 will get new locks thanks to a $100,000 grant from the Mesa County Federal Mineral Lease District. The Loveland Daily Reporter-Herald reports Thompson schools north of Denver are seeking a state grant for locks.

ENVIRONMENT

BRUSH FIRE CONSUMES HOME IN RURAL GARFIELD COUNTY

RULISON, Colo. — A brush fire that burned about 50 acres of rural Garfield County destroyed a home near Rulison before fire officials got the flames under control.

The Post Independent reports that the brush fire had already engulfed the home when Garfield County officials arrived on the scene Sunday. There were no reported injuries to humans or animals.

The fire did not reach any other structures and a helicopter helped drop water on the flames.

Sunday's brush fire was the second reported in the area in the past week. A fire between Rifle and Rulison closed westbound traffic on Interstate 70 for several hours on Wednesday.

— The Associated Press