Colorado’s “far-fetched” hyperloop hopes fade as traffic woes continue | SummitDaily.com

Colorado’s “far-fetched” hyperloop hopes fade as traffic woes continue

Arrivo, one of the companies with its sights set on the Centennial State, has closed up shop

Jackson Barnett / The Denver Post
Arrivo, a next-generation road system, requires dedicated lanes and autonomous vehicles to move passengers and their cars at up to 200 mph. The ‘hyperloop-inspired’ technology doesn’t use vacuums or tunnels, but dedicated infrastructure that can regulate up to 20,000 vehicles an hour.
via The Denver Post

For people who spend their days thinking about how to solve the traffic problems along the Front Range and Interstate 70 corridor, late 2017 brought an intriguing announcement that was one part futuristic technology, one part hype and another part encouraging economic development news.

And it came in the form of Brogan BamBrogan, a tech leader with a cool name and an even cooler mustache.

His thick, half-brown half-grey contour of hair twitched above his upper lip as he spoke from a TEDx stage in Sacramento in April 2016. His topic: the future of transportation. A future that was supposed to be as effortless as it would be traffic-less, and one that was supposed to be realized in Colorado.

Fast forward to November 2017 when BamBrogan’s company, Arrivo, said they planned to build a test track along E-470 for a technology called hyperloop, which essentially is a track or tube that transports pods that levitate on magnets and can reach speeds over 200 mph. Theoretically.

Read the full story on The Denver Post website, click here.


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