Top 5 most-read stories last week: Winter weather, short-term rental moratorium and a new recycling bill | SummitDaily.com
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Top 5 most-read stories last week: Winter weather, short-term rental moratorium and a new recycling bill

A dumpster bin for recycling cardboard located at the recycling center in Frisco on Friday afternoon, Dec. 27, 2019. Colorado’s legislature recently passed House Bill 1355, a producer responsibility bill that requires companies to pay for recycling programs for their containers, packaging and paper.
Deepan Dutta/Summit Daily News archive

Stories in this list received the most page views on SummitDaily.com in the past week.

1. Summit County government implements short-term rental moratorium in neighborhood zones

For the second time within a year, Summit County government has passed a short-term rental moratorium. The first three-month moratorium took effect last fall, and now this second nine-month moratorium, effective immediately, will put a pause on any licenses being issued within the county’s neighborhood zones.

The moratorium does have some exemptions, including people who are already under contract with a home and had planned to apply for a license. The county will also set up a process where community members can apply for a special exemption for other unique circumstances, too.



— Jenna deJong

2. Colorado recycling bill to put responsibility on companies rather than consumers

Colorado’s legislature recently passed House Bill 1355, a producer responsibility bill that requires companies to pay for recycling programs for their containers, packaging and paper.



The program will be fleshed out over the next few years. The bill’s timeline has plans being implemented in 2026, which proponents of the bill say gives companies and local governments enough time to develop what will work best to create a coordinated, statewide system for recycling. Currently, Colorado’s recycling rate is at 15%, which is less than the national average and the state’s goal of 28% by 2021.

The bill aims to make recycling for Coloradans more accessible and more uniform.

— Eliza Noe

3. Frisco’s free Concert in the Park series announces summer lineup of bands, nonprofits

The free Concert in the Park series is returning to the Frisco Historic Park this summer from June 23 through Sept. 8. People can expect music from multiple genres at 5:30 p.m. on consecutive Thursdays at 120 Main St.

Guests are invited to bring lawn chairs and well-behaved, leashed pets. Each week, a different local nonprofit raises funds by selling refreshments.

— Jefferson Geiger

4. Weekend snow brings moisture boost to Summit County

Across the state of Colorado, spring snowstorms brought precipitation to much of the state, adding moisture to melting snow stock.

Data from the Natural Resources Conservation Service shows a small bump in snow water equivalent starting on May 20. Before that, snow water equivalent for the Blue River had been declining rapidly since May 6.

The 30-year median peak for snow water is April 22 at 16.6 inches, but in 2022, the Blue River saw its snow water peak at 15.6 inches on April 18. Still, this year shows improvement over snow water equivalent data in 2021, which had a peak of 13.5 inches on April 2. On May 20, six sites recorded 5.5 inches for the Blue River, and by May 22, that total had been brought up to 6.6 inches.

— Eliza Noe

5. Double-dose of avalanches means winter’s still here

The work of the Summit County Rescue Group never stops in the mountains — just like winter weather. Avalanches continue to slide throughout the county, posing danger to recreationists.

Last weekend’s snowfall led to a spike in avalanche reports, Colorado Avalanche Information Center director Ethan Greene said Thursday, May 26.

A skier triggered an avalanche Wednesday, May 25, in the Fourth of July Bowl on Peak 10. The avalanche was reported to Colorado Avalanche Information Center by a friend of the skier involved, Greene and Summit County Rescue Group spokesperson Anna DeBattiste said.

The second avalanche Wednesday occurred on Peak 1. It was not reported to emergency dispatch services or the avalanche center, but the news was relayed directly to the Summit County Rescue Group mission coordinator.

Neither avalanche harmed anyone.

— Luke Vidic


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