Feds want to crack down on appeal rights of terrorists | SummitDaily.com

Feds want to crack down on appeal rights of terrorists

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DENVER – Federal officials are asking a judge to allow them to halt DU students from helping convicted terrorists win back some of their rights.The government is now arguing that the rules, called special administrative measures, or SAMs, should also forbid prison visits by University of Denver law students who are representing two of the terrorists in a civil-rights lawsuit against the government, The Denver Post reported Sunday.The students find it more than ironic that the rules they are fighting would block them from getting involved.It started after terror suspects in Spain were found with letters from three Supermax convicts. The feds now want to bar the students from helping as well as to bar the inmates from writing letters to anyone outside their immediate family or attending prison religious services.The students have filed a lawsuit in the District Court of Wiley K. Daniel, who acted to grant some access.Federal officials have asked the judge to reconsider, arguing, among other things, that because the students aren’t yet lawyers they might be willing to pass messages to terrorists because they would not lose their licenses.University of Denver law professor Laura Rovner said the students themselves could be prosecuted, making the argument irrelevant.”There are very real consequences, and the stakes are quite high,” Rovner said. “If the students were to violate the SAMs, they will never be licensed to practice law and there would be the possibility out there of a criminal conviction for passing information.”