Frisco Planning Commission: A neighborhood is the best use for Peak One parcel | SummitDaily.com

Frisco Planning Commission: A neighborhood is the best use for Peak One parcel

Bob Bloch, Tom Connolly, Dodie Davies, Jim Fuxa, Larrie Mackie. Tim Sabo, Atul Subberwal: Frisco Planning Commissioners

There has been considerable controversy raised by both factions concerning the Peak One parcel, open space and the “Right to Vote” initiative. As residents of Frisco who also serve on the council appointed, all volunteer Frisco Planning Commission, we would like to set the record straight on some of these issues.

Though purchased by town in 1998, the Peak One parcel was neither annexed nor rezoned at that time. When the site was acquired from the U. S. Forest Service, it was designated “for future ‘municipal uses.'” Biking, dog walking and any other uses made of the site were not addressed in the process. Locals’ usage developed without rules. It was never presented to the Frisco Recreation, Open Space and Trails Committee as possible open space.

In 2007, the town began the process of reviewing the potential uses of the Peak One parcel and held a number of town meetings involving citizens of Frisco. Several alternatives were presented, discussed and discarded. Through this process a Peak One Parcel Master Plan was developed. In late 2008, the town began the process of annexing and rezoning the Peak One parcel. All of these actions required review by the planning commission and recommendations of action to town council.

On December 18, 2008, the Frisco Planning Commission reviewed a proposed ordinance to establish a new zoning district as well as a proposed ordinance to annex the 12.68 acre Peak One parcel and to rezone it from Summit County Natural Resources-2, to Frisco Residential Conservation (RC).

The public comment portion of the meeting elicited a number of responses both pro and con. The commissioners identified the positive impact of having a real neighborhood on the Peak One parcel which promotes social and economic sustainability. They unanimously recommended approval of both the proposed ordinances: creating a new zoning district and annexation.

At the subsequent public meeting the commissioners concurred that Frisco needs this type of development, that the Peak One parcel is a great opportunity to provide it, and they hope that the Peak One parcel will be a “real neighborhood.” They listened to and were sympathetic to the opposition but they also felt that this is the best proposed use of the land for the future of Frisco. They unanimously recommended that town council approve the rezoning request

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During this process the planning commissioners reviewed significant amounts of material, listened to comments from both opponents and proponents of the proposed ordinances and zoning change, and discussed a number of alternatives. Throughout these deliberations, the goals of the Frisco Master Plan, the Peak One Parcel Master Plan and numerous other town and county reports and surveys identifying growth and citizens’ interest were used as a guide. Though a number of issues were raised, the primary considerations of the commission were fair and legal application of the principles set forth in the master plan. Frisco has always intended that this parcel be developed for “municipal purposes.” The fact that it has been used by residents as open space for a number of years does not change this. Following this lengthy process, the members of the Frisco Planning Commission feel that the decisions regarding the Peak One parcel rezoning and annexation represent the best use of this land for the Town of Frisco, now and in the future to provide for a more sustainable, viable, livable and vibrant community.