Genuine Jazz announces summer lineup | SummitDaily.com
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Genuine Jazz announces summer lineup

BRECKENRIDGE -Most jazz festivals offer sizzling daytime performances, but Genuine Jazz in Breckenridge adds a romantic nightclub atmosphere to the mix.

Genuine Jazz in Breckenridge returns for its 19th year June 27-29 at the Hyatt Main Street Station, Maggie Pond and various clubs throughout Breckenridge.

This year, Joyce Cooling, named best new talent in the “Jazziz” readers’ poll and artist of the year by the nationally syndicated radio show “Jazz Trax,” joins the lineup. San Francisco Bay area jazz fans knew Cooling as one of the region’s most dynamic and popular guitarists for years when her debut CD, “Playing It Cool,” took the contemporary jazz world by storm in 1997 and hit No. 1 on smooth jazz charts. Her latest CD, “Third Wish,” gives smooth jazz a bite – blending



Brazilian-flavored grooves with infectious jazz-funk tracks and introspective ballads.

Rising stars Darren Rahn and Anthony James Baker make their debut at the festival this summer. As a saxophonist, Rahn has played and recorded with such artists as the Yellowjackets, Kirk Whalum, Bela Fleck and the Flecktones and Dave Leibman. He currently works with internationally renowned jazz artist Nelson Rangell and specializes in programming and sequencing for rhythm-and-blues, jazz and pop music. British-born Baker honed his skills at local pubs throughout England and later performed and recorded with members of Tears for Fears and Big Country in the 1980s. His fiery, passionate guitar playing blends jazz, rock, Latin and blues music.



A cappella sensation Groove Society and vibraphone virtuoso Steve Raybine round out the new lineup. Raybine co-founded the critically-acclaimed progressive jazz ensemble Auracle, touring the United States and Europe and recording two albums on Chrysalis Records. As a Los Angeles studio musician in the mid-1970s, he played for episodic and commercial television soundtracks at MGM, Universal and Paramount recording studios. His performance credits include Ed Shaughnessy, Dizzy Gillespie and Jack Jones, among others.

Returning musicians include Rangell, Bryan Savage, Dotsero and Laura Newman and AOA.

Known for his versatility with windwood instruments, Rangell connects with audiences through his rich and varied tones.

“Music is a certain type of language,” Rangell said. “My music is put forward in a way I hope is positive and affirming.”

Savage strives to blow the roof off clubs with his soulful sax.

“We play with about as much energy as you’d see in any rock ‘n’ roll show,” Savage said.

Newman and AOA infuse jazz with the blues, which has placed Newman in the forefront of the regional music scene. She returned to her Chicago-style, Motown-based upbringing after trying smooth jazz and finding it just didn’t resonate with her. Her band’s music continues to transform as new musicians enter the scene.

“It keeps mutating in different places because of how open we are to everything,” Newman said.

Dotsero’s sax player Stephen Watts has been known to jump in the Maggie while playing, but wet sax or not, Dotsero is committed to bathing the audience in a multisensory experience.

Piano sensation Jeanne Newhall also returns to the festival for an encore performance with sax man Jarred, along with the Big Swing Trio, Buckner Funken Jazz and the Summit Jazz Consort.

Known for its laid-back atmosphere, the festival showcases styles ranging from new age and fusion to mainstream jazz. The sultry sounds begin at 9 p.m. Friday, June 27, with paid admission shows at Breckenridge clubs and restaurants. A $35 weekend pass includes admission to all four clubs Friday night and all five clubs Saturday night. The Friday-only nightclub pass is $20; Saturday’s is $25. Free daytime performances begin at 10:30 a.m. at the Hyatt Main Street Station stage and continue on the floating stage at the Maggie Pond. For more information, visit http://www.genuinejazz.com.


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