Colorado launches new pilot program to improve sign language interpreting services in rural areas | SummitDaily.com

Colorado launches new pilot program to improve sign language interpreting services in rural areas

Summit Daily staff report

The Colorado Commission for the Deaf, Hard of Hearing and Deafblind announced this month a new pilot program meant to help bring improved sign language interpreting services to rural Colorado towns.

Later this month the organization will hold the first three meetings of The Rural Interpreting Services Project — a two-year, $1.4 million pilot program — in Durango, Alamosa and Grand Junction. More locations are expected to be announced at a later date.

The program is meant to address a relative lack of quality access to interpreting services for medical, legal, community and work-related situations by offering sign language interpreters in rural areas at no cost to consumers or service providers. While people living on the Front Range have access to established interpreting services, the services are often an expensive barrier for hearing impaired individuals along the Western Slope and in more rural areas.

The meetings this month will be held from Oct. 25–29, and will include snacks and refreshments. The first meetings will be on Oct. 25 at the Fort Lewis College Center of Southwest Studies in Durango from 5:30-7:30 p.m. The second meeting will be held on Oct. 26 at Adams State University in Alamosa from 2-4 p.m. The third meeting will be on Oct. 29 at the Center for Independence in Grand Junction from 2-4 p.m.

Interested parties can learn more at CCDHH.com, or by contacting the commission at ccdhhdb_risp@state.co.us.

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