High Country Conservation Center and Summit County host radon mitigation workshop | SummitDaily.com

High Country Conservation Center and Summit County host radon mitigation workshop

Summit Daily staff report
news@summitdaily.com

A free workshop on radon mitigation will be held at the Frisco Community and Senior Center on Thursday, Jan. 29, from 5:30 to 7:30 in the Loveland Room.

January is Radon Action month. Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that can cause lung cancer. You can't see or smell radon but it might already be a problem in your home. Radon is emitted from the breakdown of uranium in soils and can creep up through the foundation of your home, permeate your crawlspace, or fill your basement, potentially putting you and your loved ones at risk for lung cancer.

High levels of radon can be found in all 50 states, and half of all homes in Colorado have radon levels higher than the EPA-recommended action levels.

Testing for radon is the only way to know if you're exposed. The EPA and Surgeon General have strongly recommended that all homes get radon tested. Radon testing generally takes only a few minutes and can be done with a simple kit.

Radon-reduction systems can reduce gas levels by up to 99 percent.

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Winter is a great time to test your home for radon because its concentration tends to be higher during the colder months when windows and doors are closed. "There has been a tremendous increase in people wanting to test and mitigate their homes in Summit County. We have distributed over 1,700 free kits," Maya Kulick, of Summit County Environmental Health, said. You can pick up a free test kit today at the High Country Conservation Center or the Summit County Environmental Health office.

If you find you've been exposed to unsafe levels of radon, contact the county Environmental Health office for recommendations on how to lower your exposure.

The office has a list of certified radon mitigation contractors who can help fix the problem. Radon-reduction systems can reduce gas levels by up to 99 percent.

New homes can be built with radon-resistant techniques. However, even a new home should be tested for radon after occupancy to ensure the mitigation measures are working. For information visit http://www.co.summit.co.us/radon or contact the High Country Conservation Center at (970) 668-5703.