Lake Dillon Fire finance manager to retire Tuesday | SummitDaily.com

Lake Dillon Fire finance manager to retire Tuesday

Linda Boucher, finance manager for Lake Dillon Fire-Rescue, plans to retire Tuesday after working with LDFR for 26 years.
Courtesy of Lake Dillon Fire-Rescue |

After years of work behind the scenes, Lake Dillon Fire-Rescue’s finance manager, Linda Boucher, plans to retire on Tuesday, March 31.

While working for Lake Dillon Fire for 26 years, Boucher oversaw its $8 million budget, following the district’s growth after five departments merged into Lake Dillon Fire. Now, she looks forward to retirement with her husband, Tim.

“This was the best job ever,” Boucher said in a statement. “It’s just been a great job and great people and a good atmosphere to work in and feel like you’re doing something for the community. It’s very bittersweet.”

Boucher began her career with Lake Dillon Fire as a volunteer firefighter, when her husband and then-chief Tony Cimino were friends. With a knack for medical work, Boucher gained her Emergency Medical Technician certification and volunteered for Summit County Ambulance for 10 years.

“We made a lot of long-lasting friendships from those volunteer days, when the fire department was your social life,” Boucher said. “We’d go to a call and end up back at somebody’s house and have a barbecue.”

Later, when Lake Dillon Fire posted an opening for a job office manager, Boucher took the job. At the time, the department was still young, with only seven employees. Now, Lake Dillon Fire has grown to 57 employees.

“She’s been an exceptional employee,” Lake Dillon Fire chief Dave Parmley said in a statement. “Her contributions, level of trust, dedication to our mission of service and the kind of work ethic exhibited each and every day has been outstanding.”

Boucher and her husband hope to spend time traveling and watching for wildlife in their recreational vehicle. However, they still plan to maintain their roots in Summit County.

“I could work here for years and be perfectly happy,” Boucher said. “There’s just a few things we need to do before we get too old to do them — places to go, things to see.”


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