Summit County health coalition features broccoli at local grocery stores | SummitDaily.com

Summit County health coalition features broccoli at local grocery stores

Alli Langley
alangley@summitdaily.com

The Physical Activity and Nutrition Team of the Summit (PANTS) will celebrate National Food Day on Saturday, Oct. 24, at local grocery stores with free food samples, cooking demonstrations, bilingual recipe cards and healthy living tips.

PANTS members will man booths from 10 a.m. to 2 pm at City Market in Dillon, Natural Grocers in Dillon, Whole Foods Market in Frisco and Breckenridge Market & Liquor.

The PANTS members typically work for local health and wellness businesses and nonprofit organizations and will answer questions about cooking, physical activity, food banks, nutrition programs and other health topics.

The superstar food for this year’s event is broccoli, and featured recipes will be roasted broccoli with lemon parmesan sauce, sesame broccoli salad with cashews and broccoli cheddar soup with cannellini beans.

For more information, visit the PANTS Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/PANTSsummitctyco.

Free healthier living classes begin Nov. 4 in Frisco

A free program to help people manage ongoing health conditions such as heart disease, a lung condition, diabetes or arthritis will be held on Wednesdays in Frisco.

The class is Nov. 4 to Dec. 16 from 5-7:30 p.m. at the Frisco Medical Office Building in the Ten Mile Room on the second floor. The six-week class is open to the community, and no class will be held Nov. 25.

Offered by the Consortium for Older Adult Wellness, Healthier Living Colorado is the chronic disease self-management program developed at Stanford University. Whatever the diagnosis, this class teaches and supports participants in making better choices and practicing self-management.

COAW is a nonprofit organization that provides health and wellness leader trainings, community health classes and falls prevention screenings to assist individuals and communities in achieving better health.

For more information or to register, contact Brennan Paige at 888-900-2629 or brennan@coaw.org. For more information about the Consortium for Older Adult Wellness, visit http://www.coaw.org.

Colorado’s teen birth rate continues to drop

Colorado’s teen birth rate has been cut nearly in half during the first five years of the Colorado Family Planning Initiative.

According to new data from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, both the birth rate and abortion rate for women ages 15 to 19 fell 48 percent from 2009 through 2014. Previous 2009-2013 data showed a 40 percent drop in teen births and a 35 percent decline in teen abortions.

CDPHE credits the declines to the five-year statewide Colorado Family Planning Initiative that has provided training, operational support and 36,000 long-acting reversible contraceptives — IUDs and implants — to low-income women in Title X family planning health centers across Colorado.

“This initiative continues to prove its effectiveness,” said Dr. Larry Wolk, CDPHE executive director and chief medical officer. “Thousands of low-income Colorado women now are able to pursue their dreams of higher education and a good career and choose when and whether to start a family.”

Three of four teen pregnancies in Colorado are unintended, and children born to mothers who did not intend to get pregnant are more likely to experience child abuse, poor health and educational challenges.

IUD and implant use among family planning clients grew from 4.5 percent before the initiative began to 29.6 percent in 2014. Nationally, only 7.2 percent of women use these most effective forms of birth control.

The increased use of long-acting reversible contraceptives also benefitted Colorado women ages 20-24, dropping their birth rate by 20 percent and their abortion rate by 18 percent from 2009 through 2014. Medicaid avoided approximately $79 million in birth-related costs from 2010 to 2012, making the initiative’s return on investment $5.85 for every dollar spent.

When private funding, which was financed by an anonymous donor, ran out in June 2015, several of Colorado’s leading foundations together provided $2.2 million in bridge funding to support the program.

CDPHE will look in the coming year for more sustainable funding.

Health officials recommend flu vaccinations

State health officials say Coloradans wanting to protect themselves from seasonal influenza should get vaccinated now.

“We recommend getting vaccinated as soon as possible since flu season is so unpredictable. It takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies to develop and provide protection against the flu virus,” said Lynn Trefren, immunization branch chief at the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.

Annual seasonal influenza vaccination is recommended for everyone 6 months of age and older. People at high risk of serious complications from seasonal influenza include those 65 years and older, children younger than 5, pregnant women and people of any age with certain chronic medical conditions.

Last year in Colorado, there were 3,397 hospitalizations and six pediatric deaths caused by the flu. Last year’s number of hospitalizations far exceeded the 2,157 hospitalizations reported during the 2009-10 flu pandemic.

Children aged six months through eight years may need to get two doses of the vaccine spaced at least four weeks apart.

People 65 and older are able to receive the high-dose flu vaccine, when available, to create a stronger immune response, but should not delay getting vaccinated to wait for the high-dose product.

Visit http://flushot.healthmap.org to find out where to get vaccinated.


Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.