Summit County holds cleanup day, hundreds of volunteers pitch in | SummitDaily.com

Summit County holds cleanup day, hundreds of volunteers pitch in

Summit County residents pitched in on Saturday for annual town cleanup days in Breckenridge, Dillon, Frisco and Silverthorne. Hundreds of volunteers grabbed Hi Vis jackets, gloves and garbage bags before going to work picking up trash and debris around the county's streets, trails and rivers to prepare for the beginning of another great summer in the High Country.

Frisco Mayor Gary Wilkinson said he was proud of his fellow townsfolk for coming out in force to help with the annual spring cleaning.

"Frisco's a great community," Wilkinson said. "We always have hundreds of people come out for cleanup day. It's a great Frisco tradition, our locals look forward to getting together to clean up the town and getting ready for the summer."

Frisco special events manager Nora Gilbertson, who organized the town's cleanup day, said the event is a great way for the town to mark the end of winter and get its bearings as it prepares for a busy summer tourism season.

"After the winter season, with all the snow and wind, there's a lot of trash that gets blown around and stuck in odd places," Gilbertson said. "It's great that so many people come out to clean up the community, get trash out of our environment, and get the town ready for our guests this summer."

In Frisco, the day was especially momentous as it also marked the 35th anniversary of the town's historical museum. Over a hundred Frisco residents gathered in front of the museum for a community photo, which is taken every five years to chronicle Frisco's changing faces over time.

Simone Belz, director of the museum, said residents appreciate Frisco's legacy and take pains to preserve it.

"I always say this is a small town with a big history," Belz said. "From the Utes, the trappers, the miners, the railroad history, all the way to the ski industry, there's been so much preserved here in Frisco. The community is really proud of its history and historic park. There's great educational synergy here, and the community takes a lot of pride in heritage tourism here."

At noon, volunteers were called back for a barbeque party with free food, drink and music provided by the town, Lost Cajun restaurant, Outer Range Brewery and Climax Mine. Members of the Frisco Town Council manned the grill, cooking and serving burgers and hot dogs for the dozens of volunteers lining up for grub.

Prizes were then handed out for volunteers who found the most interesting garbage finds during the cleanup. A volunteer named Mary won the prize for Most Unique find for a well-preserved guitar case. A volunteer named Lila took the time to collect dozens of cigarette butts into a gallon-sized plastic baggie and won the prize for Grossest find. Finally, a young man named Lucas won the prize for Most Valuable find when he found a wallet once owned by a Denver resident among some rocks in the neighborhood.

"It was pretty awesome to find it," Lucas exclaimed. "It was old, pretty torn up." His best friend Maggie added it seemed that someone might have found the wallet before they did.

"There were lots of credit and debit cards, but no cash," Maggie said. "So we think someone might have took all the cash out and thrown it away."

The budding investigators handed the wallet over to Frisco police, who said they would try to mail it back to the original owner, sans cash.

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