Summit County Off-Road Riders recognized for staying on track | SummitDaily.com

Summit County Off-Road Riders recognized for staying on track

Breeana Laughlin
blaughlin@summitdaily.com
Submitted photo

Enthusiasts of a sport that’s gotten a bad rap are being lauded for their ability to stay on track. The Colorado Off-Highway Vehicle Coalition recently named the Summit County Off-Road Riders off-highway vehicle club of the year.

The group, known as SCORR, promotes responsible off-road motorcycle recreation in Summit County — and works to preserve the sport.

“We as a group don’t feel we have to be everywhere, but we feel we have to be somewhere,” said SCORR president Chuck Ginsberg. “We need a place to ride within our county.”

The group was recognized for its ability to work with local governments, the U.S. Forest Service and homeowners and come to agreements about appropriate off-road riding destinations, rules and regulations — and for its volunteer work to design and maintain single-track trails.

“For years there really wasn’t any real cooperation or working with each other,” Ginsberg said.

But after watching more and more areas becoming cordoned off from them, he said, the group realized it needed to become more actively involved in local planning process.

“It really started becoming the trend to close out off-road riding, or motorized use. We don’t want to be shut out everywhere,” he said.

SCORR has actively promoted responsible motorcycle recreation in the Golden Horseshoe area near Breckenridge for several years. Club members are now working with Ken Waugh, the Dillon Ranger District’s recreation staff officer; Scott Reid, with the town of Breckenridge; and Brad Eckert, with Summit County Open Space and Trails, to create a plan that re-routes additional trails that are steep and eroded.

They’ve also worked with leaders of the White River National Forest on a Travel Management Plan.

Waugh said he’s been impressed with the level of participation and cooperation the off-road group has exhibited through its work with the agency. The off-road riders have initiated a patrol program, spread education about riding responsibly and embarked on volunteer projects on forestlands, he said.

“It’s understandable how they would be recognized by Colorado Off-Highway Vehicle Coalition because they demonstrate the right way to be involved,” Waugh said.

Ginsberg said his group has worked to address noise concerns and to establish regulations about proper times of day and of the season to ride. It also pays close attention to the routes and designs of trail systems.

More than 30 group members volunteered to help reconstruct trails in the Golden Horseshoe area this summer. The group is planning two more volunteer events in August.

The Off-Highway Vehicle Coalition said it was impressed with the hands-on approach SCORR has taken toward responsible trail use. This was one of the deciding factors in naming SCORR the off-highway vehicle club of the year.

“Through the efforts of many of the club’s members, Summit County Off-Road Riders stays actively involved with the Forest Service and local governments to maintain public lands for all trail users and sets the example for others to follow,” Off-Highway Vehicle Coalition director Scott Jones said in a news release.

Ginsburg said his group was given the award in 2008 as well. He said a key to the group’s success is its ability to walk the talk.

“Our work with local land management groups happen not just at the table, but on the ground — not just talking about getting stuff done but actually doing it,” he said.

The Off-Road Riders are hosting a volunteer trail event on the Governor King Trail in the Golden Horseshoe area from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 10. For more information or to reserve a spot, contact Jeff Stackhouse at vertigo157@hotmail.com.


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