Top 5 most-read stories last week: Skier deaths, affordable housing and avalanche burial | SummitDaily.com
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Top 5 most-read stories last week: Skier deaths, affordable housing and avalanche burial

One person was partially buried in an avalanche Feb. 13 on the west side of Loveland Pass, according to Summit County Rescue Group.
Colorado Avalanche Information Center/Courtesy photo

Stories in this list received the most page views on SummitDaily.com in the past week.

1. 21-year-old skier dies at Copper Mountain Resort

Huntingdon Valley, Pennsylvania, resident David Vasserman, 21, died at Copper Mountain Resort on Feb. 9 after losing control and landing on a rock.

A news release from the Summit County Coroner’s Office said Vasserman was skiing on expert terrain on the Bradley’s Plunge run in the Copper Bowl area.



— Jenna deJong

2. Miss United States makes a layover in Summit County

Silverthorne resident Cindy Ernst has been hosting fellow pilots in Summit County for decades. The skiing retreat started as a support group for women pilots to bond over their shared passion as they broke glass ceilings dealing with some of the professional challenges in the cockpit.



There’s a regular group of a dozen or so pilots, but as many as 40 people from around the world have landed to reconnect and share stories. The retreat is always in Summit County.

This year, one of the members of the group came with a crown and sash in her luggage. Miss United States Samantha Anderson spent the week skiing runs like Bonanza and Blackhawk.

— Jefferson Geiger

3. Six affordable housing projects in Summit County are on their way to getting developed

Six affordable housing developments in Summit County are moving right along as county and town leaders work to bring about more rental units for the local workforce.

  • Lake Hill: The proposed 436-unit development near Frisco has been in the works for more than 20 years, and it has recently picked up some steam.
  • U.S. Forest Service Compound: The county is also working on a plan to lease around 9 acres of land near Dillon from the U.S. Forest Service, which could offer 120 to 300 mixed unit types.
  • Justice Center parcel: Work on the Justice Center parcel in Breckenridge will contain up to 54 units.
  • Wintergreen Ridge: The second phase of the Wintergreen development in Keystone is likely to add 46 units to the market.
  • Soda Creek parcel: One of the smallest projects the county is tackling is a 0.75-acre development on its Soda Creek parcel in Summit Cove.
  • Bill’s Ranch parcels: The county owns two parcels in the Bill’s Ranch neighborhood and is reviewing potential conceptual layouts.

— Jenna deJong

4. 1 partially buried in avalanche on Loveland Pass

One person was partially buried in an avalanche Feb. 13 on the west side of Loveland Pass, according to Summit County Rescue Group.

The man was carried an estimated 200 to 300 feet in avalanche debris, including being carried over an estimated 50-foot cliff. He was buried up to his waist and received only minor injuries, according to a Facebook post about the incident.

— Nicole Miller

5. Summit County officials encourage public transit as congestion increases along I-70 corridor

As the number of cars driving down the Interstate 70 mountain corridor increases year over year, Colorado officials are pushing for more widespread use of public transportation options.

The I-70 Coalition, a nonprofit organization representing businesses, towns and county governments across the I-70 corridor, launched its “Break up With Your Car” campaign Feb. 8. The goal of the campaign is to get people to rethink their options when traveling from Denver to the mountains.

The campaign is largely in response to growing traffic numbers on I-70. Around 12.6 million cars traveled through the Eisenhower-Johnson Memorial Tunnels in 2021, according to an I-70 Coalition news release.

— Libby Stanford


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