On the Clock: Lodema Cullum | SummitDaily.com
YOUR AD HERE »

On the Clock: Lodema Cullum

JENNIFER HUFFMANsummit daily news
Summit Daily/Brad Odekirk Lodema Cullum, store manager.
ALL |

Lodema Cullum surrounds herself with beautiful designer sweaters, coats, jeans, skirts and handbags – but they aren’t hers. Cullum works at Rags to Riches, the upscale consignment shop on Main Street in Frisco.Owner Julie Maye recruited Cullum to work for her after purchasing the store. Cullum happily took the job, because she was able to bring her son Henry to work for the first eight months.”We get a lot of really great clothes in here like Gucci, Jean Paul Gaultier, Kate Spade,” Cullum said. “We also get brand-new items. People will buy things and never wear them.”Cullum prices the clothes at a third to a quarter of the regular retail price. She also gets first choice of any clothes she wants to purchase as people bring them in.She tries to keep up with the latest trends in order to select appropriate items for the shop by subscribing to fashion magazines like Lucky.”We have more teenagers who shop here too,” Cullum said.

What’s the best thing about working here?”I love the people. I like all the cute stuff that comes in, especially the purses.”What do you find most challenging about your job?”Staying nice when people call the store a thrift store.”

How does Rags to Riches differ from a thrift store?”We’re an upscale resale store. We only accept consignments, not donations. We make sure the items aren’t old or stained or worn out. You have to really dig for good items at a thrift store.”What’s the strangest thing someone ever brought in to sell?”An elephant hide garment bag. The guy shot the elephant himself in Africa and had it made into luggage there. It didn’t sell though, so he had to come pick it up. He wanted $850 for it.”

What brought you to Summit County?”My parents. My dad got a job here working construction, and my mom went to work for Keystone. She’s been there for 23 years.”What’s something people might be surprised to know about you?”My dad’s a blacksmith, and he’s been trying to get me into blacksmithing. I haven’t done it a lot, but it’s fun. It’s really hard work though. I have scars from doing it.””I’ve also been selling Avon for five years.”


Support Local Journalism

Support Local Journalism

As a Summit Daily News reader, you make our work possible.

Now more than ever, your financial support is critical to help us keep our communities informed about the evolving coronavirus pandemic and the impact it is having on our residents and businesses. Every contribution, no matter the size, will make a difference.

Your donation will be used exclusively to support quality, local journalism.

For tax deductible donations, click here.
 

Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.

User Legend: iconModerator iconTrusted User