Pulling for Colorado a huge success | SummitDaily.com
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Pulling for Colorado a huge success

Approximately 100 volunteers agest 9 to 90 came out on Saturday, July 12, for the first state wide noxious weed pull. Summit County was one of 22 locations across the state to take part in this event. A continuous video, “hands on live weeds,” and a short educational talk preceded the work.

Summit County had nine sites designated to pull or dig such noxious weeds as chamomile, oxeye daisy, mullein and musk thistle. Many thanks to the Towns of Breck, Dillon, Frisco, and Silverthorne, Summit County Weed Coordinator Lisa Taylor, her staff, Continental Divide Land Trust, Friends of the Dillon Ranger District, Friends of the Eagles Nest Wilderness, Summit Women’s Club and the Master Gardeners for pitching in. It was truly a countywide event.

Special thanks go to Abby Coffee and Sanitary Products Supply who donated coffee and collection bags for the event.



One site is worthy of special mention. Recently logged and disturbed areas are of a special concern going forward. Unwanted seeds are just waiting for the opportunity.

One site selected was the Frisco Nordic Center and adjoining NationalForest as our first regeneration test with the intent to carry thisproject on south to the Dillon Reservoir. It was refreshing to this team to note the regeneration taking place in the disturbed soil while at the same time it is essential that we eliminate early on such noxious weeds found such as chamomile, oxeye daisy and musk and salvage going on as a community we have a challenge going forward.



Why should we care? As Lisa pointed out in the training, 5,000 acres of land are lost everyday to invasive species. Acres then having little value for agriculture as well as wildlife. Millions of acres in the west are already infested. Millions of dollars have been lost in crop production due to noxious weeds. Close to home 2- 3,000 acres are covered with yellow toadflax in the Camp Hale area alone. This noxious weed is poisonous to wildlife.

It was a great day, an activity that the whole community can be involved in. There are no boundaries to be effective. We must all become educated and take charge.


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