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Restaurant inspections to be reduced

SUMMIT COUNTY – Proposed Summit County budget cuts will result in fewer health inspections in a resort county with about 300 retail food outlets.

County Environmental Health Department manager Jim Rada told county commissioners Monday that, if he has to lay off an inspector, inspections will decrease to about 75 to 80 percent of their current levels.

About $42,000 is at stake in a department staffed by Rada, two inspectors and an administrator.



The 300 retail food outlets currently require about 520 inspections. By state law, major establishments such as restaurants require two inspections per year, while convenience stores need only one.

The Board of County Commissioners put environmental health on the chopping block because retail food inspections are really a state function.



Summit is one of about 15 counties in the state performing inspections to create a higher level of service for the greater public good.

Commissioner Gary Lindstrom said Gov. Bill Owens should resolve issues pertaining to restaurant inspections and their cost.

“Our governor wins awards for sound fiscal responsibility and for doing such a great job with the state budget. I think he should pay for the program,” Lindstrom said. “Screw the state. I am serious. I would love to have restaurant owners, the resorts and others start picketing his office. It is his responsibility to pay for this.”

Rada doesn’t see that happening. He said he believes that after the Nov. 5 election, a new round of state budget cuts will eliminate the subsidy to counties doing their own retail food inspections.

Rada said that up to this point, he thinks the county program has worked well.

SUMMIT COUNTY – Proposed Summit County budget cuts will result in fewer health inspections in a resort county with about 300 retail food outlets.

County Environmental Health Department manager Jim Rada told county commissioners Monday that, if he has to lay off an inspector, inspections will decrease to about 75 to 80 percent of their current levels.

About $42,000 is at stake in a department staffed by Rada, two inspectors and an administrator.

The 300 retail food outlets currently require about 520 inspections. By state law, major establishments such as restaurants require two inspections per year, while convenience stores need only one.

The Board of County Commissioners put environmental health on the chopping block because retail food inspections are really a state function.

Summit is one of about 15 counties in the state performing inspections to create a higher level of service for the greater public good.

Commissioner Gary Lindstrom said Gov. Bill Owens should resolve issues pertaining to restaurant inspections and their cost.

“Our governor wins awards for sound fiscal responsibility and for doing such a great job with the state budget. I think he should pay for the program,” Lindstrom said. “Screw the state. I am serious. I would love to have restaurant owners, the resorts and others start picketing his office. It is his responsibility to pay for this.”

Rada doesn’t see that happening. He said he believes that after the Nov. 5 election, a new round of state budget cuts will eliminate the subsidy to counties doing their own retail food inspections.

Rada said that up to this point, he thinks the county program has worked well.


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