Skier fatalities: Myths about who dies, and where, debunked | SummitDaily.com
YOUR AD HERE »

Skier fatalities: Myths about who dies, and where, debunked

A Copper Mountain Ski Patrolman, right, along with an unidentified skier, pull an injured skier up a small hill on a patrol sled on the ride down to the St. Anthony Copper Mountain Clinic at the base of the mountain Friday, March 1st, 2013. Andy Cross, The Denver Post
Andy Cross / The Denver Post

Local skiers often assume that those killed on the slopes of Colorado’s ski resorts are tourists new to skiing or riding, but that couldn’t be further from the deadly truth.

The average person who died on the slopes of U.S. ski resorts during the 2015/2016 season was a 30-something experienced male skier wearing a helmet who hit a tree going too fast on an intermediate run, according to the National Ski Area Association’s annual report on safety.

“Beginners on green runs tend to be more cautious,” said Jasper Shealy, a professor emeritus of the Rochester Institute of Technology who analyzes ski safety data. “It’s when you get on the blue runs with a mix of abilities and speeds that things become less controlled.”

Read the full story at the DenverPost.com.

— By Chryss Cada | Chryss@chryss.com | The Denver Post


Support Local Journalism

Support Local Journalism

As a Summit Daily News reader, you make our work possible.

Now more than ever, your financial support is critical to help us keep our communities informed about the evolving coronavirus pandemic and the impact it is having on our residents and businesses. Every contribution, no matter the size, will make a difference.

Your donation will be used exclusively to support quality, local journalism.

For tax deductible donations, click here.
 

Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.

User Legend: iconModerator iconTrusted User